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Navigating the Unlikely Path to the C-Suite | Paul Carbone & Tom Asacker

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As executives move their way up the ranks and into the C-Suite, they must not forget the journey that brought them there. Many C-level leaders start out with humble beginnings, and their drive and determination to achieve greatness have gotten them to where they are today. From manning the cash register, to taking the leap and starting your own business, anyone can develop the leadership skills required to move into an executive role.

Our first guest, Paul Carbone, is a living example of an entrepreneur who worked his way up to the C-Suite. Paul serves as Chief Financial Officer at Dunkin’ Brands, and his journey to this role was certainly not that of a traditional CFO. Paul says his experiences working in the produce industry, and later founding his own businesses, have given him a unique perspective on running a business. Entrepreneurs, he said, have a certain “get it done” mindset that C-Suite leaders can adopt in their own positions of leadership.

No matter the titles of those you work with, a culture of mutual respect is absolutely essential. A leadership team may not always agree on the many facets of running a business, but a sense of alignment, even after a heated discussion, will sustain a company through thick and thin.

Our second guest, Tom Asacker, author of “The Business of Belief,” says people are pushed and pulled by their environments, and it’s often difficult to get to the root of their beliefs. It is beliefs, after all, that can hold us back or propel us forward toward our goals. To get a better sense of a person’s belief system, we must look at their actions. For leaders to motivate their teams and create a unified culture, they must walk the walk. Motivation starts with movement, and progress can only occur when we take that first step toward our goals.

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