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WEBBWEAVER BOOKS PROUDLY PRESENTS: AUTHOR P.I. BARRINGTON

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WEBBWEAVER BOOKS

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In 2032, Las Vegas, Nevada, remains Sin City, but it's a poor representation of what it once was several decades ago. Casinos sit like half built skeletons, decaying alongside the old haunts that still operate at half capacity. Jobs are scarce and what workers who fill the remaining jobs, including those of city officials, police officers, and fire fighters, must do the work of several people. Family homes lie deserted, abandoned to homeless squatters. Rubbish litters the streets, toxic pollution fills the skies, and once thriving businesses lie derelict and boarded up. Water's rationed and the heat's a killer, thanks to the decaying ozone layer. A serial killer is leaving crucified women in abandoned, half-finished casinos, and it's the job of LVPD Homicide Detectives Payce Halligan and her new partner, British ex-Deputy Chief Inspector Gavin McAllister, to apprehend him. While each attempts to deal with a past tragedy, the dangers they encounter multiply. When they split up to follow the killer's multiple trails, Payce suddenly goes missing. Gavin's frantic search for her leads him to James, a 15-year-old boy who's escaped from The New Creation's guarded cult-like compound on the outskirts of town. Those in power at TNC seem to be stirring more than one pot of stew. James believes someone from New Creation is responsible for all the killings, and now his friend and fellow TNC “dweller” Edana is missing. Together James and Gavin follow the abandoned maze of mine tunnels beneath the city in an attempt to find Payce and Adana before they become the killer's next victims. P.I. Barrington's Crucifying Angel has all the edge-of-the-seat tension of aDan Brown novel and the graphic futuristic world-building so intrinsic to a J.D. Robb work. The plot pace barely allows you to draw a breath between scenes, and throughout

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