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TEENS HOMICIDE, SUICIDE AND FIREARM DEATHS PART TWO

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TEENS SPEAKING OUT

TEENS SPEAKING OUT

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In 2010, males ages 15 to 19 were nearly four times more likely to commit suicide, six times more likely to be victims of homicide, and eight times more likely to be involved in a firearm-related death than were females of the same age.

IMPORTANCE

Homicide and suicide is the second and third leading causes of death, respectively, among teen’s ages 15 to 19, after unintentional injury. In 2010, firearms were the instrument of death in 85 percent of teen homicides and 40 percent of teen suicides.While non-firearm injuries result in death in only one out of every 760 cases, almost one in four youth firearm injuries are fatal.

Although other teens are the perpetrators of many of the homicides of teens below age 18, two-thirds of the murderers are eighteen or older  Gang involvement has been associated with many teen murders; in 2002, nearly three-quarters of teen homicides were attributed to gang violence. Although school-related homicides receive substantial media attention, in the 2009-10 school years they accounted for about one percent of all child homicides.

Mood disorders, such as depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disease, are major risk factors for suicide among children and adolescents. One study found that more than 90 percent of children and adolescents who committed suicide had some type of mental disorder. Stressful life events and low levels of communication with parents may also be significant risk factors, Female teens are about twice as likely to attempt suicide; however, males are much more likely to actually commit suicide.

 

 

 

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