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Eden Foods: Turning Old World Grains Into Modern Pasta

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The Organic View

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Ask the average person what they know about pasta. A typical response is it's spaghetti, ziti or some commercial Italian dish. In New York and other areas with large Italian communities, pasta is traditionally served on Sunday afternoons when friends gather with the family. Did you know that many fad diets discourage the consumption of pasta? This is because most pasta is made from highly processed flour and contains preservatives that are not very good for you. Many people are also finding that they have a low or zero tolerance of gluten. However, pasta that is made from whole grains IS very good for you! Spelt, Triticum spelta, is a non-hybridized ancient grain and a distant relative of modern wheat. Cultivated over 9,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent, it was the staple bread wheat of Europe and the Middle East until replaced by modern wheat. The 12th century healer, St. Hildegard von Bingen, said “Spelt is the best of grains. It produces a strong body and healthy blood for those who eat it and it makes the spirit of man light and cheerful.” She believed that it was “the easiest to digest of all grain.” Recent research has found spelt’s highly water soluble gluten is easy to digest and can often be enjoyed by those intolerant to modern hybrid wheat. Eden Foods has turned making pasta into an art. They have not only created a whole line of certified organic and verified non-gmo pastas but have done so using whole grains. Their Kamut pasta is actually made from grain that is known as King Tut’s wheat! Even the boxes are fully compostable! In this segment of The Organic View Radio Show, Michael J. Potter, President and Chairman of Eden Foods, Inc.,(http://www.edenfoods.com) will my guest. Is it possible that pasta made from other grains can taste really good? Will it make you fall asleep right after you eat it? Is whole grain better than white wheat pasta? Is there such a thing as low-carb pasta? Stay tuned!

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