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BROCKET 99: Native Parody and "international underground phenomenon"

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WARNING: SALTY LANGUAGE!

AUDIO IS DELAYED 2-3 MINUTES AT BEGINNING OF PROGRAM DUE TO TECHNICAL PROBLEM!

Acclaimed recently by President of Friends of the Oglala Lakota, Brocket 99 is the name of an underground comedy audio tape that parodies aboriginal people in Canada and the name of two documentary films about the tape (one produced in 2005, and the other in production).

The world's most controversial Radio Parody. We donate a % of every audio product to 1st Nations & Native American Causes.

The parody played on numerous aboriginal stereotypes and has been characterized as racist. The tape included names of real people, stores and towns and is an "international underground phenomenon"

The tape was created in 1986 by radio DJs in Lethbridge, Alberta, purportedly inspired by a clip of a parody of gay men running a radio station called "AIDS Radio".The "Brocket 99" tape was never made to be marketed and was meant as a parody.

Brocket 99 Part 2 was recorded in 1986 but was released in 1989

The premise of the tape was a fictitious radio station broadcasting from Brocket, Alberta, on the Northern Peigan reserve (a real reservation 70 km west of Lethbridge), hosted by a character named "Ernie Scar". It stereotypes natives as drunken bums, welfare recipients and drug addicts and uses pejorative terms to describe native men as "bucks" and native women as "squaws". Songs played on the tape included complete versions of multiple hits by artists such as AC/DC and Dwight Yoakam, often in a row. Between the songs and the DJ segments are fake ads for real products such as Dr. Scholl's foot powder and Lysol spray.[citation needed]

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