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No Biking In The House Without A Helmet

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Melissa Green, author of No Biking in the House Without a Helmet, shares the touching, difficult, amazing and satisfying experiences of adopting 5 children (for a total of 9!) internationally, with all the unexpected twists and turns nobody could have imagined!

If there has ever been a moment in which you looked at where you are in the parenting process and felt your children were growing up so fast that this part of your life would soon be over, you cannot miss this incredible story. Today's international adoptions are rife with pitfalls-children who have been institutionalized since birth and don't know how to attach and live in families, children who have lost the ability to play because they were expected to die from AIDS and have had no experience with playing, "orphans" who are not really orphans, and malnutrition.

Melissa Fay Greene and her husband, Don Samuel, learned a LOT about the adoption business, the risks and challenges of adoption, and connected with experts in the business, and then adopted 1 from Bulgaria and 4 from Ethiopia, adding them to their family for a total of 9 children. She's written about the experience in a new book, No Biking in the House Without a Helmet, and presents her story on August 11 on Full Power Living.

Melissa Fay Greene's five works of nonfiction have been recognized with 10 awards, including two National Book Award Finalist citations, a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist citation, the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize, and the ACLU National Civil Liberties Award. Her first book, Praying For Sheetrock was named one of the top 100 works of American journalism of the 20th century and was recently named one of Entertainment Weekly's "New Classics-The 100 Best Books of the Last 25 Years."

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