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Who Really Assassinated Malcom X And Martin King!

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Johnson succeeded to the presidency following the assassination of John F. Kennedy, completed Kennedy's term and was elected President in his own right, winning by a large margin in the 1964 Presidential election. Johnson was greatly supported by the Democratic Party and, as President, was responsible for designing the "Great Society" legislation that included laws that upheld civil rights, Public Broadcasting, Medicare, Medicaid, environmental protection, aid to education, and his "War on Poverty." He was renowned for his domineering personality and the "Johnson treatment," his coercion of powerful politicians in order to advance legislation.
Simultaneously, he greatly escalated direct American involvement in the Vietnam War. As the war dragged on, Johnson's popularity as President steadily declined. After the 1966 mid-term Congressional elections, his re-election bid in the 1968 United States presidential election collapsed as a result of turmoil within the Democratic Party related to opposition to the Vietnam War. He withdrew from the race amid growing opposition to his policy on the Vietnam War and a worse-than-expected showing in the New Hampshire primary. Privately! Johnson worked against Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King and Minister Malcolm X as they sought to unite their campaign differences. It is becoming common knowledge of Johnson's "racist bully tactics" and "racist political politics."  He first designed the death of Malcolm X in 1965. Later he designed the death of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr in 1968. To stand against any thing that Lyndon Johnson stood for was welcome suicide. Among them was protesting the war of vietnam ( Dr. King) and the internationalization of the Negro struggle to the United Nations (Malcom X).

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