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The History of Black Americans and the Black Church #53

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Daniel Whyte III

Daniel Whyte III

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Our Scripture Verse for today is Ephesians 5:19-20 which reads: "Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord; Giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ."

Our History of Black Americans and the Black Church quote for today is from Lee June, a professor at Michigan State University and the author of the book, "Yet With A Steady Beat: The Black Church through a Psychological and Biblical Lens." He writes, “A study by Wallace and Forman showed some of the benefits of religion for American youth. Drawing from a large sample taken from the University of Michigan's Monitoring the Future Project, approximately 5,000 youth were studied. They found that compared to their peers, religious youth (those who saw religion as important and were regular attendees) were less likely to engage in behaviors that compromise their health. For example: behaviors such as carrying weapons, getting into fights, and drinking and driving were cited. Additionally, religious youth were more likely to behave in ways that enhance their health. For example, proper nutrition, exercise, and rest.”

Our first topic for today is titled "The Plantation System, Part 6" from the book, "From Slavery to Freedom" by John Hope Franklin. 

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Our second topic for today is "Negro Religion in the City, Part 3" from The Negro Church in America by E. Franklin Frazier.

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Our third and final topic for today is from "The Black Church in the U.S.: Its Origin, Growth, Contributions, and Outlook" by Dr. William A. Banks.

Today we are looking at part 20 of Chapter 4: "Reconstruction and Retaliation -- 1866 to 1914"

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