• 00:26

    The Controversy Surrounding Sulfoxaflor

    in Environment

    Sulfoxaflor is a new systemic pesticide from the sulfamine family. While it is not a neonicotinoid, it is systemic pesticide that targets the same neural receptors as the neonicotinoids. Without any prior notice to beekeepers, the EPA announced in June 2012, that it would grant a section 18 (emergency permission to use an unregistered product) for use on cotton in four southern states: Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee and Louisiana. The EPA has recently announced the opening of the public comment period on sulfoxaflor. The EPA plans to grant sulfoxaflor a conditional registration despite many serious unresolved questions as to its safety and consequences not only for the honeybees but for the wider environment as well. Is this a repeat process, or lack thereof, regarding the neonicotinoid, Clothianidin? In this special series called “The Neonicotinoid View”, host, June Stoyer talks to beekeeper and bee advocate, Tom Theobald about the controversy surrounding the conditional registration of this pesticide. Stay tuned!

  • 00:30

    The Neonicotinoid View: The Impact Of Sulfoxaflor

    in Environment

    Sulfoxaflor is from the sulfamine family and is also a systemic pesticide. Sulfoxaflor is effective against a wide range of sap-feeding insects and exerts its insecticidal activity as an agonist at the insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), which plays a central role in the mediation of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the insect central nervous system. Sulfoxaflor has not been evaluated previously by the Joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Pesticide Residues and was reviewed at the present Meeting at the request of the Codex Committee on Pesticide Residues. While it is not a neonicotinoid, it is systemic pesticide that targets the same neural receptors as the neonicotinoids.
    As we continue our special series called “The Neonicotinoid View”, hosts June Stoyer and special guest-host, Tom Theobald will be joined by Dr. Susan E. Kegley, to discuss the impact of sulfoxaflor and discuss the pros and cons of this agro-chemical.
    Dr. Kegley is Principal and Founder of the Pesticide Research Institute (PRI), an environmental consulting firm providing research, analysis, technical services and expert consulting on the chemistry and toxicology of pesticides. Dr. Kegley’s consulting work focuses on pollutant fate and transport; human and ecological exposure assessment and risk assessment; development of tools to assess relative risks for different pesticides; development of integrated pest management (IPM) approaches to minimize pesticide use; environmental monitoring (with a focus on air and water sampling); and analytical chemistry. She also has expertise in pesticide regulation and policy, ecotoxicology, human toxicology, and epidemiology. Dr. Kegley has a BS in Chemistry, Summa cum laude, from the University of Richmond and a PhD in organic/inorganic Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  • 00:31

    Dr Susan Kegley Discusses The Impact Of Sulfoxaflor

    in Environment

    As we continue our special series called “The Neonicotinoid View”, hosts June Stoyer and special guest-host, Tom Theobald will be joined by Dr. Susan E. Kegley, to discuss the impact of sulfoxaflor and discuss the pros and cons of this agro-chemical. Dr. Kegley is Principal and Founder of the Pesticide Research Institute (PRI), an environmental consulting firm providing research, analysis, technical services and expert consulting on the chemistry and toxicology of pesticides. Dr. Kegley's consulting work focuses on pollutant fate and transport; human and ecological exposure assessment and risk assessment; development of tools to assess relative risks for different pesticides; development of integrated pest management (IPM) approaches to minimize pesticide use; environmental monitoring (with a focus on air and water sampling); and analytical chemistry. She also has expertise in pesticide regulation and policy, ecotoxicology, human toxicology, and epidemiology. Dr. Kegley has a BS in Chemistry, Summa cum laude, from the University of Richmond and a PhD in organic/inorganic Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  • 00:53

    The Neonicotinoid View- Is Sulfoxaflor The Next Systemic?

    in Environment

     
     
    What do you do when you have a flawed technology? You come up with an advanced version. This is a common practice with manufacturers of cell phones, computers and even with agro-chemicals. With the race to get sulfoxaflor, (a sap-feeding insecticide) “emergency” registration, the question remains, what is the rush to get this new systemic on the market?
    In 2010, Clothianidan was also granted registration without having completed the requirements for registration as mandated by law. Clothianidin is of the neonicotinoid family of systemic pesticides, which are taken up by a plant’s vascular system and expressed through pollen, nectar and gutation droplets from which bees then forage and drink. Scientists are concerned about the mix and cumulative effects of the multiple pesticides bees are exposed to in these ways. Neonicotinoids are of particular concern because they have cumulative, sublethal effects on insect pollinators that correspond to CCD symptoms – namely, neurobehavioral and immune system disruptions.
    Is this new agro-chemical going to improve agriculture? What effects, if any, will this have on the bees as well as other pollinators?
    In this special series produced by The Organic View called “The Neonicotinoid View”, host, June Stoyer, is joined by special guest host, Tom Theobald to discuss the impact of sulfoxaflor. Tom Theobald is a founding member of the Boulder County Beekeepers’ Association. In July 2010 Theobald wrote an article about clothianidin and bees for Bee Culture magazine. “Do We Have a Pesticide Blowout” ignited a conversation about the connection between systemic pesticides, specifically clothianidin, and declining bee populations in the United States. Stay tuned!

  • 00:26

    The Neonicotinoid View: Tom Theobald Discusses Sulfoxaflor

    in Environment

    Sulfoxaflor is a new systemic pesticide from the sulfamine family. While it is not a neonicotinoid, it is systemic pesticide that targets the same neural receptors as the neonicotinoids. Without any prior notice to beekeepers, the EPA announced in June 2012, that it would grant a section 18 (emergency permission to use an unregistered product) for use on cotton in four southern states: Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee and Louisiana. The EPA has recently announced the opening of the public comment period on sulfoxaflor. The EPA plans to grant sulfoxaflor a conditional registration despite many serious unresolved questions as to its safety and consequences not only for the honeybees but for the wider environment as well. Is this a repeat process, or lack thereof, regarding the neonicotinoid,  Clothianidin?
    In this special series called “The Neonicotinoid View”, host, June Stoyer talks to beekeeper and bee advocate, Tom Theobald about the controversy surrounding the conditional registration of this pesticide. Stay tuned!

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