• 00:29

    STOP FIGHTING THE TRUTH!!! #Exodus1715 #TheSicarii Guerrila Hebrew

    in The Bible

    Join Chief Priest Ahlazar BanLawya AKA The Guerrilla Hebrew of Exodus1715 AKA The Sicarii & Deacon of Defense Hakah Gawayam as they discuss critical trending topics globalls and within the community of Hebrew Israelites.


    www.Youtube.com/Xodus1715


    www.Youtube.com/Sicarii1715


    www.Exodus1715.info


    www.Instagram.com/Exodus1715

  • 00:30

    Black Nobility: The Anti-Christ in Movies - Dune 1984

    in Entertainment

    Tonight we look at the portrayal of the Anti-Christ in movies and for tonight the iconic Dune based on Frank Herbert's famous Sci Fi novel that many people know nothing about its hidden codes. The original can be seen here:


    http://vimeo.com/99210962


    In 1984 was another iconic movie Dreamscape starring young Dennis Quaid, and both this and Dune are used on the infamous Monarch psychic black ops program Theta~Θ that we will discuss.


    The name Kwisatz Haderach from Frank Herbert's Dune series, translated as "the Shortening of the Way", is derived from the term kefitzat haderech.


    Kefitzat Haderech (Hebrew: ???????? ?????????, Modern Q?fi?at haDére? or Kfitzat haDérech Tiberian Q?p¯î?á? hadDére?) is a Jewish Kabbalistic term that literally means "contracting the path." The word kefatz has both the meaning "to shorten" as well as "to jump".


    Kefitzat Haderech refers to miraculous travel between two distant places in a brief time. It is perhaps similar to the Lung-gom-pa magical travel in Tibet, and, like the Tibetan practice, involves the use of magical or divine names. The Talmud lists three biblical stories in which this miracle occurs. In early stories of the Chasidic movement, wonder-working rabbis are ascribed the ability to reach destinations with unnatural speed.

  • 00:30

    Judas Did Not Betray Jesus! IV

    in Psychology

    Peter wanted Jesus position as leader of the Sicarii!
    Sicarii (Latin plural of Sicarius 'dagger-men' or later contract-killer, Hebrew ????????) is a term applied, in the decades immediately preceding the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD, (probably) to an extremist splinter group[1] of the Jewish Zealots, who attempted to expel the Romans and their partisans from Judea using concealed daggers (sicae).[2]  "When Albinus reached the city of Jerusalem,[3] he bent every effort and made every provision to ensure peace in the land by exterminating most of the Sicarii." —Josephus, Jewish Antiquities (xx.208) The Sicarii used stealth tactics to obtain their objective. Under their cloaks they concealed sicae, or small daggers, from which they received their name. At popular assemblies, particularly during the pilgrimage to the Temple Mount, they stabbed their enemies (Romans or Roman sympathizers, Herodians, and wealthy Jews comfortable with Roman rule), lamenting ostentatiously after the deed to blend into the crowd to escape detection. Literally, Sicarii meant "dagger-men".[4] The victims of the Sicarii included Jonathan the High Priest, though it is possible that his murder was orchestrated by the Roman governor Felix. Some of their murders were met with severe retaliation by the Romans on the entire Jewish population of the country. On some occasions, they could be bribed to spare their intended victims. Once, Josephus relates, after kidnapping the secretary of Eleazar, governor of the Temple precincts, they agreed to release him in exchange for the release of ten of their captured comrades.

  • 00:29

    Judas Iscariot, Lee Harvey Oswald, Sirhan, James Earl Ray?

    in Psychology

     
    Sicarii (Latin plural of Sicarius 'dagger-men' or later contract-killer, Hebrew ????????) is a term applied, in the decades immediately preceding the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD, (probably) to an extremist splinter group[1] of the Jewish Zealots, who attempted to expel the Romans and their partisans from Judea using concealed daggers (sicae).[2]  "When Albinus reached the city of Jerusalem,[3] he bent every effort and made every provision to ensure peace in the land by exterminating most of the Sicarii." —Josephus, Jewish Antiquities (xx.208) The Sicarii used stealth tactics to obtain their objective. Under their cloaks they concealed sicae, or small daggers, from which they received their name. At popular assemblies, particularly during the pilgrimage to the Temple Mount, they stabbed their enemies (Romans or Roman sympathizers, Herodians, and wealthy Jews comfortable with Roman rule), lamenting ostentatiously after the deed to blend into the crowd to escape detection. Literally, Sicarii meant "dagger-men".[4] The victims of the Sicarii included Jonathan the High Priest, though it is possible that his murder was orchestrated by the Roman governor Felix. Some of their murders were met with severe retaliation by the Romans on the entire Jewish population of the country. On some occasions, they could be bribed to spare their intended victims. Once, Josephus relates, after kidnapping the secretary of Eleazar, governor of the Temple precincts, they agreed to release him in exchange for the release of ten of their captured comrades.

  • 00:36

    Judas Did Not Betray Jesus! I-IV

    in Psychology

     
    Sicarii (Latin plural of Sicarius 'dagger-men' or later contract-killer, Hebrew ????????) is a term applied, in the decades immediately preceding the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD, (probably) to an extremist splinter group[1] of the Jewish Zealots, who attempted to expel the Romans and their partisans from Judea using concealed daggers (sicae).[2]  "When Albinus reached the city of Jerusalem,[3] he bent every effort and made every provision to ensure peace in the land by exterminating most of the Sicarii." —Josephus, Jewish Antiquities (xx.208) The Sicarii used stealth tactics to obtain their objective. Under their cloaks they concealed sicae, or small daggers, from which they received their name. At popular assemblies, particularly during the pilgrimage to the Temple Mount, they stabbed their enemies (Romans or Roman sympathizers, Herodians, and wealthy Jews comfortable with Roman rule), lamenting ostentatiously after the deed to blend into the crowd to escape detection. Literally, Sicarii meant "dagger-men".[4] The victims of the Sicarii included Jonathan the High Priest, though it is possible that his murder was orchestrated by the Roman governor Felix. Some of their murders were met with severe retaliation by the Romans on the entire Jewish population of the country. On some occasions, they could be bribed to spare their intended victims. Once, Josephus relates, after kidnapping the secretary of Eleazar, governor of the Temple precincts, they agreed to release him in exchange for the release of ten of their captured comrades.

Join Host Live Chats

Loading...
Loading...