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  • 00:31

    ALEX MITCHELL talks of owning SUNSET CREST/SANDY LANE - PLANTATION DEEDS

    in Radio

    THERE WILL NEVER BE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION IN BARBADOS.   There is no education regarding Plantation history in Barbados.   


    Alex Mitchell will talk to us tonight about Plantation Deeds and land fraud.

  • 00:53

    TRU SPORTS TALK EPISODE 2

    in Sports

    On tonight's episode of TRU SPORTS TALK we go right back into some of the controversial topics that are happening today in the world of sports. We also take a historical look into the factors that have shaped the perception of mainstream sports with a goal of providing insight and clarity to the listeners. The goal of the program is to help parents, coaches, and administrators see a different perspective on the world of sports and entertainment. 


    TOPICS INCLUDE


    Lack of Black Head Coaches in Sports


     


    One and Done in College Basketball


     


    Plantation Model in Football


     


    AAU Basketball Reform


     


    Gay Athletes In Sports


     


    Racism in Sports


    AND MUCH MORE


     

  • 00:31

    Reader's Entertainment Radio Show Presents: Tina DeSalvo

    in Books

    You'll want to tune in this Thursday, July 30th at 6pm EST. Author Tina DeSalvo joins me to chat about her books, life, and her Friend's Fight Together initiative. She enjoys writing stories where she can use her imagination, humor, empathy, and personal experiences to create characters and situations that she hopes will entertain readers. Her latest novel, Jewell: A Second Chance Novel, is Volume 2 in the series.


    Book Blurb:


    Once invited into New Orleans' historic mansions to evaluate prized antiques, Dr. Jewell Duet held a coveted professorship at a top university. With her deep knowledge of Louisiana history and antiquities, she was the go-to person for anyone requiring professional appraisals. But, one hasty decision cost her both her reputation and possibly her freedom. Now, as she waits to discover if her future includes prison, Jewell knows that taking the job at Sugar Mill is necessary if she is to support her beloved grandmother who has advanced dementia.

    Charming, sexy lawyer Beau Bienvenu's attraction to the intriguing historian vies with his distrust of her motives. Beau has one simple goal when it comes to the family that rescued him and made him part of their clan...protect them at all costs. He doesn't trust Jewell, nor her reason for taking the lowly job at Sugar Mill Plantation. What is she really up to? Is it possible Jewell and her quirky grandmother are there to try to profit from a Bienvenu family mystery? If so, both women are out of luck.

    Jewell and Beau are at odds about almost everything. The only things they agree on are that family is everything...and that their mutual attraction is inconvenient.


    Hope, Love and Second Chances Continue in the heart of Cajun Country.
     


     

  • 01:00

    Exploring Laura Plantation and Faubourg Treme

    in Travel

    Louisana's Creole culture and a famed New Orleans' neighborhood share the spotlight on today's show.  Our Creole cultural exploration takes us just outside New Orleans to the Old Mississippe River Road where we'll share the story of a Creole family and a plantation named Laura--voted "Best history tour in the USA" by Lonely Planet Travel and a top travel attraction in Louisiana.  Laura Plantation, named after Laura Locoul Gore, is an old sugarcane plantation over 200 years old.  We experienced life on the plantation as a member of the Locoul family through the voice of one of Laura's decendents, Norman Marmillion.  We will also visit Faubourg Treme with filmmaker Dawn Logsdon.  Treme is considered the oldest black neighborhood in America and the birthplace of the civil rights movement in the South.  Treme is a place where African-Americans lived free during slavery and became a place of social and economic diversity.  

  • 01:24

    William Still Father of The Underground RR, descendant Francine Still Hicks

    in Education

    We are pleased to introduce to you Author Francine Still-Hicks! Francine is the direct descendant of entrepreneur and philanthropist William Still. A black abolitionist, Mr. Still authored the 800 plus page book,The Underground Railroad which is comprised of Records of Facts and Authentic Narratives. Still was Harriet Tubman's Financier, Social Media Guru, Publicst and Friend! The New York Times described Mr. Still in his obiturary as the "Negro Known as "Father of the Underground Railroad" -- Once a Slave, He Died Very Wealthy" He died a millionaire.


    Listen to The Gist of Freedom Archives at www.BlackHistoryUniversity.com and WWW.BlackHistoryBlog.com


    Francine is Bringing the genealogy of family history as a conduit - passage way - the underground to finding... "You!"


    Using "A Girl Named Charity" as a comparison of a modern day plantation we are living in todays society we can overcome! The hardships, obstacles and competitive world around us - we must never give up our "Hope, Faith and Charity" to find our way to the Freedom. Once you are on your path to liberation you will discover your true self in side - "The Me I Never Was!"


    "The Me I Never Was" gently guiding us into the emancipation of all labels placed upon us. Stripping the chains that has bound us from who we were born to be - and discovering a "boundless spirit" born with an authentic matrix!


    Looking Forward in Peace & Freedom,


    Francine

  • 01:07

    Stepping Into My Power BTR Interviews Author & Historian Teresa R. Kemp

    in Health

                                                        Host Dr. Imani Ma'at


    Join us on June 17, 2015  Featuring Teresa R. Kemp, Author of Keeper of the Fire


                                  Show Time: 9PM EST, 8PM CST, 7PM MT, 6Pm PST)
                                                  Call in number: 646-915-9853


                                                  Press 1 to Join the Host Queue


    Mrs. Teresa R. Kemp (Nana) is the 5th generation quilter and owner of Plantation Quilts & UGRR Secret Quilt Code Museum.  In 2005, with her parents she opened the UGRR Secret Quilt Code Museum. Closed in 2007, Mrs. Kemp is a colon cancer and congestive heart failure survivor. A staunch advocate for conservation, healthier lifestyles for all, she continues to return to be active in the YMCA's Live Strong program. Tune in to learn about her rich multi-cultural background and history.  She is heading to Ghana shortly for the very high honor of being Enstooled as a Nana.   

  • 02:01

    Chicken

    in Comedy

    All aboard the train to Plantation??????

  • 01:20

    WEEP FOR THE LIVING-Anne Butler

    in Entertainment

    A survivor's firsthand account of attempted murder in St. Francisville, Louisiana. A former warden of Angola Prison shoots his wife five times with a pistol, then sits down to watch her die on her plantation home porch. The victim, author Anne Butler, survives to tell this true crime story, detailing the unraveling of her seven-year marriage and how it led to her near-murder. Interspersed with simple black and white snapshots, this stranger-than-fiction story of murder, survival, and forgiveness offers keen insights into the mind of both victim and criminal. WEEP FOR THE LIVING-Anne Butler

  • 01:02

    12 Years To "Make" A Slave - The Gentrified Person

    in Real Estate

    On "It's My House" we shall discuss what makes up a "Gentrified Person". People who are gentrified are slaves.  By observation It takes a person about (12) years to BECOME a "Gentrified Slave". How does this happen :



    12 years of "institutionalized" education.
    12 years of being told to get a "job" instead of starting a business.
    12 years of watchiing your parents buy things on credit that they could not afford.
    After you graduate from high school or college.....you become a debt slave by purchasing a car, house, wedding rings, etc. etc.
    People who live in neighborhoods that get gentrified are usually "Debt Slaves" and are too busy living the life of a slave and when they wake up....one day they discover that their neighborhood has become "The Plantation"...........and they have to move out.


    Visit us: www.itsmyhouseonline.com


    Call "It's My House Radio" 712-432-8863

  • 02:12

    Are We Still on the Plantation ???

    in Self Help

    Are We Still on the Plantation ??? Is the question we will ask on this timely topic. What do you have to say about this issue, and what to do .  Wednesday February 18th, 2015 8pm eastern time.

  • 02:00

    SATURDAY HIGH NOON

    in Politics

    State news shorts, commentary and part 3 of my discussion with Kansas activist Frank Smith of Pine Bluff about the billionaire Koch brothers and emperor Brownback's legions.


    Read Chris Reeves up-to-the-minute state budget report as the legislature "goes into hiding."


    Thaddeus Russell is author of A Renegade History of the United States (Free Press, 2010). Russell's talk was recorded by Todd Boyle and broadcast on "Mind Over Matters" by Mike McCormick (www.talkingsticktv.org).


    New World Notes is produced under the auspices (Latin for "gun") of WWUH-FM, a community service of that beacon of light in darkest Connecticut, the University of Hartford.


    The leisure we enjoy today--weekends, vacations, etc--was not granted freely by employers. Rather, it was taken without permission by "renegade" workers of decades past. These included slaves, drunken craftsmen, unmotivated factory hands, etc. For instance, plantation slaves established the practice of "vacation"--much to the annoyance of their masters. (They'd agree to return in exchange for not being punished.)


    Part 2 focuses on sex and women's rights. Many rights and freedoms enjoyed today by U.S. women (and their male friends) were won for them--not by feminists--but by 19th & early-20th century prostitutes & madams. These include the right to own property; to acquire wealth; to dance, smoke, and drink in public; to wear attractive clothing; to give or receive oral sex; to have interracial intimacy; and to use contraceptives. 


    A rollicking good story, well-told by Thaddeus Russell.