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  • 00:34

    Adrenaline and Your Health

    in Health

    Dr Michael Platt has published a book, "Adrenaline Dominance: A Revolutionary Approach to Wellness".  He examines the role that adrenaline may plan in a number of conditions that are quite often misunderstood, including ADHD, Irritable bowel syndrome, PTSD and Autism.  He offers dietary ways to control the over-production of adrenaline.


    With a background in diseases that cause pheochromocytoma -- a tumor that causes over-production of adrenaline -- Joyce is eager to discuss with him how to differentiate between pheos and the kind of medically treatable adrenaline dominance that he discusses in his book.  Pheos are difficult to diagnose, and they notoriously do not respond to medical treatment.  Undiagnosed pheos can be life-threatening if they are not diagnosed and removed, especially during pregnancy.  Some pheos can even metastasize.  If you have a pheo, it is extremely important to diagnose and remove this dangerous tumor.  Pheos are also sometimes called paragangliomas, especially when they occur in the region of the chest or neck.  They can occur anywhere from the earlobe to the groin, on either side of the body, along the sympathetic nervous system.


    Please listen and participate in this discussion.  


    For more information on pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, please see
    http://www.pheoparatroopers.org/information/about-pheo-para/
    https://science.nichd.nih.gov/confluence/display/pheo


    There are more than 20 tiny genetic flaws that can increase one's chance of having a pheo or para.  If you know that any of these conditions runs in your family, be sure to get tested for the presence of one of these tumors before embarking on Dr. Platt's treatments.  It will be easier to diagnose the pheo-para before this treatment.


     

  • 00:30

    Interview with Steve Owens, adrenal patient

    in Health

    Steve was diagnosed with HyperBeta Adrenergic Syndrome in August, 2005. Doctors thought he might have a pheo, now they're checking for ACC cancer. Steve also has a newspaper article written about him. Steve's daughter may also have Cushing's.

  • 00:30

    Steve Owens (sowens) returns to talk about support networks and agencies

    in Health

    Steve Owens (sowens) returns on May 29, 7:30. His topic will be building up support networks and using available agencies to get back to work (rehab, PT/OT, job coaches, etc). Steve was diagnosed with HyperBeta Adrenergic Syndrome in August, 2005. Doctors thought he might have a pheo, now they're checking for ACC cancer.