• 02:11

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:08

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:32

    Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas

    in Women

    On March 10th at 2pm Eastern, the NLN will be hosting a Blog Talk Radio titled Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas: Strategies that Work. This 30 minute discussion will feature Latina activists who will talk about the intersections of violence against women and girls and HIV/AIDS from a culturally specific perspective.  

  • 01:00

    Our Viral Lives: Young Activists Discuss HIV/AIDS

    in LGBT

    Unfortunately, some people believe that HIV/AIDS is over. Many of us know better. While the leaders of the early movement are very visibile to some -- names like Peter Staley and Mark Harrington come to mind -- some are unsure about who will be leading the movement of tomorrow. More importantly, what will the HIV/AIDS epidemic look like in the future? Today, we will speak with four young activists who recently presented at New York City's LGBT Center about their work as young HIV/AIDS activists. We will talk with Kyle Bella, the founder of Our Viral Lives, a digital narrative project, Martez Smith, an HIV+ black public health student, Kia Labeija an artist and photographer and a part of New York City's famed House of Labeija and Charlie Ferrusi, an MPH student who hopes to enter the world of government work and make advocacy for underrepresented populations his focus. 


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton. 

  • 00:45

    Hearing the Voice of God!

    in Christianity

    Tonight's topic is Hearing the Voice of God! How do know when God is talking?

  • 00:30

    Maria Davis-Premier Promoter- Aids Activist

    in Women

    Maria began a professional modeling career at the uncommon age of twenty-one in the early eighties—when black faces were rarely seen in magazines. But it was Maria’s true love of Black music that led her to her professional calling. Having a keen eye for talent and with the help of mentors, she became known as one of New York’s premiere promoters. Maria created the legendary M.A.D. Wednesday’s music showcases which continues to provide venues for signed and unsigned R&B and hip-hop artists and comedians who had no other performance options In 1995 Maria’s life took a turn when she contracted the HIV virus unknowingly from her soon-to-be-husband. Along with keeping her M.A.D. Wednesday showcases going strong, Maria dedicates her life as an HIV/AID’s activist.  She regularly speaks to educators, health care providers, ministers and social workers regarding HIV/AIDS awareness and sensitivity including being the key note speaker for the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS. She has appeared on numerous radio and television shows including WBLS, MTV and BET and has been honored by many including; New York Urban League, National Black Commission and Trailblazer Award to name a few. Maria is a mother of two and continues paying it forward.

  • 01:01

    Hearing Gods Voice Part 1

    in Christianity

    Hearing God speak to you will change you and your walk with Him. The Father wants you to experience Him like never before, so He can be the one who guides you in these "Last Days".

  • 00:25

    Faith Comes By Hearing

    in Christianity

    And hearing comes by the word of the LORD so then knowing this we will dive heart first into the word of God, the will of God and the peace of the ALMIGHTY 


    Fors His plans are good and ways are good so then let us enter His rest and find peace with our creator


    Life in Christ is far from easy however it is designed for war and victory daily through sacrifice and living is always bette

  • 01:33

    National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

    in Health

    This year, February 7, 2015 marks the 15th year for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD). This is a national HIV testing and treatment community mobilization initiative targeted at Blacks in the United States and the Diaspora. The Black Aids Institute is the only organization that focuses their attention solely on black people with HIV/AIDS. This year there are some shocking findings and scientific evidence that speak about treatment and opportunities in the black community when it comes to the HIV/AIDs epidemic.National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is a call for Black American to recognize that HIV is indeed a Black phenomenon & the reality that HIV disproportionately affects Black people and especially Black men who have sex with men (MSM) and Black women. Hank Millbourne will discuss information about the number of Black MSM diagnosed with HIV and the myth of black men and how they engage in sex. Hank will also talk about how the community should educate themselves, become more involved, and know what their status is and if you are infected to get treated. 

  • 01:04

    Black HIV/AIDS Awareness with Anna DeShawn & the QCrew

    in Entertainment

    HIV/AIDS is still a major issue in our community. What are we doing about it? Did you know that infection rates are on the rise? 


    Let's talk about it family. 

  • 01:01

    Hearing Loss: Fact vs Fiction & Meet A Radical Survivor on Read My Lips Radio

    in Lifestyle

    READ MY LIPS' akaRadioRed goes beyond the typical blah-blah-yada-yada canned interview, engaging multiple guests in spontaneous conversations.



    "Can't hear me? Got a banana in your ear?" If you remember this "joke" from when you were a kid, it's time to learn the truth about hearing loss, which is NOT a laughing matter for millions of people. According to Tim "The Hear Doctor" Frantz, MD, we typically begin to experience hearing loss as early as age 12. His book, Hearing Loss: Facts and Fiction: 7 Secrets to Better Hearing is an easy-to-read guide that busts myths about hearing health, testing and aid devices. Dr. Tim's experience and wisdom could help you and/or a loved one avoid the ramifications of poor hearing: relationship communication issues, lower earning power, social discomfort and more. www.TheHearDoc.com.


     


    Nancy Saltzman is a "Radical Survivor" who beat cancer twice, and learned to live and love again after her husband and two sons perished in a small plane crash. Nancy wisely advises, "How you respond to loss will define you as a survivor or a victim." Learn her 3 techniques to help ensure you survive. Wondering how to express your condolences to help someone through a loss? Nancy says, "Make lasagna or at least write a condolence letter." She will also differentiate between the grief of a widow vs. a divorcée, and how to offer appropriate support to each. Her book is Radical Survivor: One Woman's Path Through Life, Love, and Uncharted Tragedy. www.nancysaltzman.com

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