• 00:30

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Clenbuterol The Dirty Little Secret

    in Fitness

    Clenbuterol Short-term Side-effects


    The short-term side-effects of clenbuterol in humans have largely been determined through accidental overdoses from eating clenbuterol-tainted meat. Short-term side-effects include the following:



    Muscle crams
    Hypertension (increased blood pressure)
    Increased heart rate
    Palpitations
    Insomnia
    Dry mouth
    Vomiting
    Tremors (shakiness especially marked in hands)
    Anxiety
    Nervousness/ restlessness
    Headaches
    Breathing difficulties
    Sweating


    Most of the above side-effects diminish when clenbuterol has been expelled from the body. However, the long-term effects of clenbuterol in humans are less well understood.


    There are no human drug safety tests and information is obtained from incidents such as those in Spain in 1994, when 140 people were reportedly hospitalized and in China in September 2006 in which 330 people were poisoned due to eating meat that had been contaminated with clenbuterol. Information is also gained from isolated case studies of those using clenbuterol for its weight loss effects.

  • 00:31

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Why Carbohydrates are not the Devil

    in Fitness

    Carbs can help boost your mood.


    Researchers suspect that carbs promote the production of serotonin, a feel-good brain chemical. In a study from the Archives of Internal Medicine, people who followed a very low carbohydrate diet for a year—which allowed only 20 to 40 grams of carbs daily, about the amount in just 1⁄2 cup of rice plus one piece of bread—experienced more depression, anxiety and anger than those assigned to a low-fat, high-carb diet that focused on low-fat dairy, whole grains, fruit and beans.


    Reason 2: Carbs can help prevent weight gain—and even promote weight loss.


     

  • 01:13

    ANGELS OF DEATH-Emily Webb

    in Entertainment

    It’s hard to imagine that anyone in the healthcare industry could have murder on his or her mind.
    But some do.

    The nineteen cases in this book range across Europe, US and Australia, documenting horrifying and sinister betrayals of trust.

    From Harold Shipman, Britain’s worst serial killer who murdered over 200 patients, to Roger Dean the Sydney nurse who in 2011 set fire to the nursing home where he worked killing 11 patients, these stories will make you wary and leave you shaking your head in horror. ANGELS OF DEATH-Disturbing Real-Life Cases of Nurses and Doctors That Kill-Emily Webb

  • 00:30

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Why Carbohydrates are not the Devil Part 2

    in Fitness

    What are saccharides?


    Saccharides, or carbohydrates, are sugars or starches. Saccharides consist of two basic compounds: aldehydes (composed of double-bonded carbon and oxygen atoms, plus a hydrogen atom), and keytones (composed of double-bonded carbon and oxygen atoms, plus two additional carbon atoms).


    There are various types of saccharides, including monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides.


    Monosaccharides


    This is the smallest possible sugar unit. Examples include glucose, galactose or fructose. When we talk about blood sugar we are referring to glucose in the blood; glucose is a major source of energy for a cell.2 In human nutrition, galactose can be found most readily in milk and dairy products, while fructose is found mostly in vegetables and fruit.


    When monosaccharides merge together in linked groups they are known as polysaccharides.


    Disaccharides


    Two monosaccharide molecules bonded together. Disaccharides are polysaccharides - "poly..." specifies any number higher than one, while "di..." specifies exactly two. Examples of disaccharides include lactose, maltose, and sucrose. If you bond one glucose molecule with a fructose molecule you get a sucrose molecule.


    Sucrose is found in table sugar, and is often formed as a result of photosynthesis (sunlight absorbed by chlorophyll reacting with other compounds in plants). If you bond one glucose molecule with a galactose molecule you get lactose, which is commonly found in milk.

  • 00:15

    Conversations Daily News with host Cyrus Webb

    in Current Events

    Join media personality and author each weekday for Conversations Daily News: a mixture of the news you need, the entertainment you want and the positivity you can't get enough of! Today Webb's entertainment segment features actor Richard Gallion who will be making his debut on the hit show EMPIRE on FOX during tonight's episode. Webb will also be taking YOUR COMMENTS on what you will be overcoming today

  • 00:16

    Conversations Daily News with host Cyrus Webb

    in Current Events

    Welcome to "Conversations Daily News". Join media personality Cyrus Webb each weekday for the most up-to-date news, entertainment reports and interviews you won't be able to find anywhere else. Each day Webb will also share some good news, encouraging listening to choose to change their perspective of the day and their lives. To contact Webb or suggest news stories email cawebb4@juno.com

  • 00:16

    The Conversations Daily News with host Cyrus Webb

    in Current Events

    Conversations Media Group debuts new show "The Conversations Daily News". Join media personality Cyrus Webb each weekday for the most up-to-date news, entertainment reports and interviews you won't be able to find anywhere else. Each day Webb will also share "Words I Choose to Live By" from his inspirational book by the same name, encouraging listening to choose to change their perspective of the day and their lives. to contact Webb or suggest news stories email cawebb4@juno.com. 

  • 00:28

    Joules Webb - STEM - Women are FIRST

    in Electronics

    One of the things we hear time and time again is the importance of Science, Technology Engineering and Math commonly referred to as STEM in the education. In order for students to be better prepared for the workforce of the future. Well, I am especially pleased to have Joules Webb on the show. Joules is the Associate Director, Pre-freshman Engineering Program (PREP), The University of Texas at San Antonio. She is also an advocate for STEM eduation and is known on Twitter as @STEMJoules.


    On today's show we learn more about what Joules is doing to promote STEM in our community. She also shares the inspiration and goals behind the Women in FIRST luncheon event.


     


     

  • 00:31

    Curtis Harwell Discusses, Why are Women Not Eating Enough Protein?

    in Fitness

    The Paleo Diet. Protein powder. Half-pound burgers.  In case you haven't noticed, our culture has become obsessed with consuming protein—which means few of us are skimping on the stuff. "We aren't known as a country that's low in protein," says Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D., author of The Flexitarian Diet. "These days, most of the hot fad diets are very pro-protein."
     
    But despite our national preoccupation with protein, some of us are still slipping through the cracks—namely vegetarians or people who tend to under-eat, says Blatner. Problem is, it can be tricky to identify what's considered "not enough" since the recommended intake of protein is a broad range, rather than one hard number.  "If somebody is eating a 2,000-calorie diet, it could be 50 grams to 150 grams of protein per day," says Blatner. (Things like activity level and weight influence where your ideal intake falls.)
     

  • 00:31

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Is Being Gluten Free Worth The Effort and Cost

    in Fitness

    What is Gluten, and Why is it In My Food?


    Gluten is a combination of proteins found in most grains, such as wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten traps water and air in a foam as bread rises, which gives it a chewy, soft, moist texture.


    Wheat is the most common source of gluten for most people. However, gluten is also used as a filler in many processed/prepackaged foods, like ketchup and salad dressing. Unless you’ve been actively trying to avoid gluten, you’ve probably been eating it almost every day. Some people think that’s a bad idea.


    Why People Think Gluten Is Bad for You


    Most of the arguments against gluten can be traced back to the idea that it increases intestinal permeability or gives you a “leaky gut.”(1-5) In a nutshell:



    Gluten enters your small intestine.
    The gluten molecules irritate and attack your epithelial cells (the ones on the inside of your small intestines).
    This irritation causes your tight junctions — the space between your intestinal cells — to widen. In some cases, gluten also directly attacks your cells.
    Gluten, bacteria, and undigested food particles sneak through these gaps between your cells and into your bloodstream.
    Once gluten and friends enter your bloodstream, your body mounts an inflammatory response.
    This inflammation spreads throughout your body, wreaking havoc on your health.

  • 00:31

    Curtis Harwell Discusses Which are Better High Carb or Low Carbs Diet Plans

    in Fitness

    Popular Diet Plans


    It seems the biggest current craze is eating low carbs. Basically, you eat a lot of protein and any kind of fats, but you drastically limit your carbohydrate intake.


    An Analysis Of Low Carbohydrate Diets!
    This article will focus on the inherent problems of all carb reduction diets, the premises discussed apply to all forms of carb reduction diets so this applies to the NHE, Atkins diet, CKD, TKD and all other carb reduction plans...


    Depending on your plan, carbs might be restricted to 50 grams or less per day. Of course to make it more confusing, carbs are subcategorized into specific types of carbs. You have sugars and starches and they're the net carbs. There are also fibers and a newly-concocted chemical called sugar alcohol. That's the ingredient glycerin, which is in your low-carb, high-protein bars that keeps the bar moist instead of being a sawdust consistency.


    Net carbs have a tendency to raise your blood sugar levels so you're not burning fat as efficiently. If you're following a low-carb plan, net carbs should be avoided. Unlike sugars and simple starches, proteins and fats do not raise the blood sugar levels and so you have the freedom to eat more of those. (Can you say hamburgers wrapped in lettuce instead of setting on a bun?)


     

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