• 01:01

    Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra and Puritan Conquistadors: R&MW

    in Culture

    This show discusses whether religion can justify violence. In his text Puritan Conquistadors, Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra suggests that Christianity was used by many people to justify conquering, exploitation, enslavement, and kiling. Do you agree with him? 

  • 01:14

    Xaviant Haze: The Suppressed History of America

    in News

    The Suppressed History of America: The Murder of Meriwether Lewis and the Mysterious Discoveries of the Lewis and Clark Expedition 


    An investigation into the discoveries of Lewis and Clark and other early explorers of America and the terrible acts committed to suppress them 

    • Provides archaeological proof of giants, the fountain of youth, and descriptions from Lewis’s journals of a tribe of “nearly white, blue-eyed” Indians 

    • Uncovers evidence of explorers from Europe and Asia prior to Columbus and of ancient civilizations in North America and the Caribbean 

    • Investigates the Smithsonian conspiracy to cover up Lewis and Clark’s discoveries and what lead to Lewis’s murder 

    Meriwether Lewis discovered far more than the history books tell--ancient civilizations, strange monuments, “nearly white, blue-eyed” Indians, and evidence that the American continent was visited long before the first European settlers arrived. And he was murdered to keep it all secret. 

    Examining the shadows and cracks between America’s official version of history, Xaviant Haze and Paul Schrag propose that the America of old taught in schools is not the America that was discovered by Lewis and Clark and other early explorers. Investigating the discoveries of Spanish conquistadors and Olmec stories of contact with European-like natives, the authors uncover evidence of explorers from Europe and Asia prior to Columbus, sophisticated ancient civilizations in North America and the Caribbean, the fountain of youth, and a long-extinct race of giants.


    XAVIANT HAZE is a freelance researcher of ancient manuscripts and alternative history. His career as a music producer and DJ allows him to travel the world, exploring and documenting his findings on lost cities and the myths of the pre-diluvian world. 

  • 02:00

    UN Representative Salasaca Aymara National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango

    in Religion

    Salasaca Aymara Elder Nicolas Chango


    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nations--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador

    By Steve Grove


    June 16, 2004


    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.


    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.


    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.


    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.


     

  • 01:59

    Salasaca Aymara (Quechua) National President Nicolas Chango

    in Religion

    Show was delayed due to unknown issues on Blogtalk's end.


    Prerecorded...


    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador

    By Steve Grove


    June 16, 2004


    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.


    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.


    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.


    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.


     

  • 01:26

    Ma-na-ta-ka (Place of Peace) with Lee Standingbear Moore

    in Religion

    From August 14, 2004...


    For thousands of years this sacred site was known as Ma-na-ta-ka (Place of Peace). 


    Elders of many nations from the four corners of Turtle Island made long pilgrimages to this magnificent place to perform ceremonies and share the gift of the curative waters called No-wa-sa-lon (Breath of Healing). 


    They received other special gifts like healing stones, healing clay and healing herbs to enhance their journey through life. Read the fascinating and true saga of Manataka and see how hundreds of tribes, Spanish Conquistadors, an American President, Mayan and Lakota spiritual leaders, and the Rainbow Woman all played a role in the exciting Story of Manataka.


    The Manataka America Indian Council exists to preserve and protect this sacred place.  Welcome to our village!  Please come into our lodge and enjoy the gifts we have for you.

  • 00:31

    Constitution Study Radio: Lesson 04, Path to the Constitution

    in Politics Conservative

    In this episode of Constitution Study Radio, we will finish Lesson 03 with a discussion about The Articles of Confederation, and the Northwest Ordinance.  Then, we will begin Lesson 04:


    The Path to the Constitution


    - Mayflower Compact


    - The Spanish Conquistadors


    - The English Charters


    - Religious Freedom in the New World


    - Individual Colonies


              Join Douglas V. Gibbs of Political Pistachio, Constitution Radio on KCAA 1050AM, and the Constitution Association, as he journeys through the United States Constitution. We will study the concepts, principles, and direct text of the U.S. Constitution from the original point of view of the Founding Fathers.



    New episodes each Sunday Morning at 9:00 am Pacific Time.  The link above is also good for listening to the podcasts of passed episodes.

  • 02:00

    Nicolas Chango, Salasaca Aymara- Ecuadorian Indigenous People's Defense Office

    in Religion

    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nations
    Nicholas Chango—Indigenous Leader from Ecuador (LinkedIn)(Website)(Facebook)


    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.


    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.


    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.


    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.


    After his high school graduation, Chango envisioned a future of political activism for the Salasacan people in mainstream Ecuadorian society. But Chango’s life changed drastically in 1989.


     


     


     

  • 01:40

    Manataka's Story with Cherokee Elder Lee Standing Bear Moore

    in Self Help

    Prerecorded August 14, 2004... PLEASE REPORT AUDIO ISSUES IMMEDIATELY TO NIGHTHAWKWEBWORKS@YAHOO.COM


    For thousands of years this sacred site was known as Ma-na-ta-ka (Place of Peace).  (website)


    Elders of many nations from the four corners of Turtle Island made long pilgrimages to this magnificent place to perform ceremonies and share the gift of the curative waters called No-wa-sa-lon (Breath of Healing). 


    They received other special gifts like healing stones, healing clay and healing herbs to enhance their journey through life. Read the fascinating and true saga of Manataka and see how hundreds of tribes, Spanish Conquistadors, an American President, Mayan and Lakota spiritual leaders, and the Rainbow Woman all played a role in the exciting Story of Manataka.


    The Manataka America Indian Council exists to preserve and protect this sacred place.  Welcome to our village!  Please come into our lodge and enjoy the gifts we have for you.

  • 01:20

    Islam in the Spanish/Hispanic/Latino culture

    in Islam

    We hear of the growing numbers of Hispanics that are converting to Islam, and we might think that this religion has nothing to do with this culture but it's quite the opposite. Islam has deep roots in Spanish history, prior to Catholism taking over and spread by force.


    Whenever we hear the story of how the "New World" or "Americas" were discovered we hear about the Catholic Monarch (King Ferdinand II/Queen Isabella I) and Christopher Columbus but what was going on, in Spain as a result of this take-over? While Christopher Columbus, Spanish explorers, and other conquistadors were ravaging through the Caribbean’s, Florida, Central and South America, the Catholic Monarch had put an end to "Al-Andalus" as we know it and introduced a new religion (by FORCE), and segregation/oppression/presecution (based on religion) to this once spiritually unified land.


    A medieval Muslim state were Muslim, Jew and Christian society lived together without persecution for religious beliefs or segregation, this place was considered to be the "Beacon of Learning". Prior to the invasion of the Catholic Monarch, while the rest of Europe was going through the "Dark Ages", Al-Andalus was thriving with universities, libraries and medical schools.


    *Nasheed ~ No Beats Necessary - "How can you deny?

  • 02:06

    Prophecykeepers - Salasaca Aymara Nicolas Chango of Equador

    in Spirituality

    Prerecorded...
    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador By Steve Grove
    June 16, 2004
    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.
    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.
    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.
    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.

  • 01:23

    Prophecykeepers Radio - Lee Standingbear Moore - Manataka

    in Spirituality

    From August 14, 2004...
    For thousands of years this sacred site was known as Ma-na-ta-ka (Place of Peace).  (website)
    Elders of many nations from the four corners of Turtle Island made long pilgrimages to this magnificent place to perform ceremonies and share the gift of the curative waters called No-wa-sa-lon (Breath of Healing). 
    They received other special gifts like healing stones, healing clay and healing herbs to enhance their journey through life. Read the fascinating and true saga of Manataka and see how hundreds of tribes, Spanish Conquistadors, an American President, Mayan and Lakota spiritual leaders, and the Rainbow Woman all played a role in the exciting Story of Manataka.
    The Manataka America Indian Council exists to preserve and protect this sacred place.  Welcome to our village!  Please come into our lodge and enjoy the gifts we have for you.

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