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  • 00:33

    Cardiac Athletes™: Beating Heart Disease Around the World

    in Health

    Cardiac athletes are all around us. There are athletes who develop heart problems or who discover, after they have been athletes for a while, that there heart has some imperfections that may require surgery and there are people who were born with heart defects who have a great desire to become an athlete and to enjoy the benefits of regular exercise. Lars Andrews, a cardiac physiologist, has created a website and an organization to eradicate heart disease. His organization serves thousands of athletes around the world. Cardiac Athletes is the world's largest online community for sporting heart patients, offering an unprecedented breadth and depth of help, support, advice and fulfilling our Mission of alleviating pain, restoring health, and extending life. Listen to today's show to learn more about Lars, why he created this program, how athletes can help themselves, even if they have had open-heart surgery and learn about the book that Lars has put together, "Cardiac Athletes: Real Superheroes Beating Heart Disease (Volume 1)." Lars even shares about how he acquired the stories for his book and how other cardiac athletes can get be part of Volume 2.

  • 01:00

    Supplements for Athletes: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    in Health

    Dana Laake and her special guest Tavis Piattoly will discuss dietary supplementation for athletes.


    Tavis Piattoly, MS, RD, LDN, is the sports dietitian and nutrition consultant for the NBA’s New Orleans Pelicans, and the Tulane University Athletics Department. Prior to this, he held the same position for the New Orleans Saints for several years. He works with athletes from high school to Olympic levels, designing individualized nutrition programs to improve their health, performance and recovery.

  • 00:15

    Should college athletes be paid?

    in Music

    Why college athletes should be paid.

  • 01:06

    Do College Athletes Deserve To Get Paid?

    in Entertainment

     


    Tune in tonight Sat. April 4th 2015 8:30 P.M. EST to The Approach with the 3Kings Radio show as we discuss the biggest debate in college athlethics. CALL IN NUMBER IS 347-857-3911 also join us in our live chat room at www.the3kingsapproach.comTopic tonight is:


    DO COLLEGE ATHLETES DESERVE TO GET PAID???


    It's one of the biggest debates in sports: should college athletes be paid? Everyone from sports fans and media personalities to the players and general public seem to have an opinion. And regardless where you stand on the issue, like it or not, college athletes might soon start to get paid. A federal judge just ruled that the NCAA can't stop players from selling the rights to their names, images and likeness, striking down NCAA regulations that prohibit them from getting anything other than scholarships and the cost of attendance at schools. This ruling could potentially allow players at big schools to have money generated by television contracts put into a trust fund to pay them when they leave school.


    Paying college athletes now is the right thing to do because it will give those who fail to be recruited by the pros a chance to buy some time, and hopefully figure out how they are going to get by with the rest of their lives and give them a little savings in the bank to work with. Also, they deserve to be paid because they are the very reason college sports fans turn on the TV and attend the games. They are what generates revenues all around. Without these kids, college sports wouldn't be college sports, and it's time to compensate them for their talents and abilities that make college sports so great.

  • 00:17

    Athletes and Rape

    in Sports

    Talking sports athletes and charges why are so many sports stars falsely accussed and then the media blows things out of proportion

  • 00:15

    WHY COLLEGE ATHLETES SHOULD BE PAID?

    in Music

    A discussion on why college athletes should be paid,

  • “Cardiac Athletes™: Beating Heart Disease Around the World

    in Health

    Cardiac athletes are all around us. There are athletes who develop heart problems or who discover, after they have been athletes for a while, that there heart has some imperfections that may require surgery and there are people who were born with heart defects who have a great desire to become an athlete and to enjoy the benefits of regular exercise. Lars Andrews, a cardiac physiologist, has created a website and an organization to eradicate heart disease. His organization serves thousands of athletes around the world. Cardiac Athletes is the world's largest online community for sporting heart patients, offering an unprecedented breadth and depth of help, support, advice and fulfilling our Mission of alleviating pain, restoring health, and extending life. Listen to today's show to learn more about Lars, why he created this program, how athletes can help themselves, even if they have had open-heart surgery and learn about the book that Lars has put together, "Cardiac Athletes: Real Superheroes Beating Heart Disease (Volume 1)." Lars even shares about how he acquired the stories for his book and how other cardiac athletes can get be part of Volume 2.

  • 00:46

    Jeff Greenwald's Mental Edge - Mark Kovacs, Ph.D - Resilient Athletes

    in Sports

    Mark Kovacs, Ph.D is a world renowned expert in excercise physiology and specifically as it pertains to Tennis Players.

    Host Jeff Greenwald author of The Best Tennis of Your Life, examines the theme of raising and training resilient athletes.  
     


     

  • 00:30

    Young gay athletes continue to show the way

    in LGBT

    There are no openly gay athletes in the NFL, NBA, NHL or Major League Baseball. Ditto for major college football, and in the just-concluded NCAA men's tournament, there were no openly gay players. This is not the case in high school, where in the past week Outsports has featured stories about three high school athletes -- a football player in Arizona, a basketball player in Kentucky and a wrestler in Iowa. All three came out on their own terms and it wasn't easy. But they perservered and showed that's it's possible even in high school to be a gay athlete. Which makes the contrast with the pros all that more glaring.

  • 01:03

    What is player personal development and why do athletes need it?

    in Sports

    Pasha Cook: After playing college basketball and graduating from Memphis State University, she sustained an injury that ended her professional basketball dream. The next ten years of her life became a journey into one career after another in search of her new purpose. After a brief career as an educator, Pasha decided she wanted to educate athletes on how to live beyond the game. Through the platforms of player personal development and speaking, Pasha educates athletes on how to identify and embrace their developed talents and potential inside aand outside of the game.


     Dr. Mark Robinson: Dr. Robinson has worked with high schools, colleges, professional athletes, educational institutions and foreign governments in order to help students and athletes succeed throughout. Dr. Robinson is quickly becoming one of the leading academics and practitioners in the Personal Player Development industry. As the Lead Consultant and Founder of Personal Player Development Magazine, Dr. Robinson has established the industry’s only online magazine (www.ppdmag.com), dedicated to the personal development of athletes and helping professionals. He is the author of Athletic Identity, Invincible and Invisible, the Personal Development of the Athlete.

  • 00:30

    Do LGBT athletes have a responsibility to come out?

    in LGBT

    This podcast brought to you by AT&T.


    Over the years we at Outsports have seen the incredible power that athletes, coaches and other people in sports coming out can have on not just their sport but youth they will never meet. Even today we got wind of a 17-year-old gay aspiring umpire who has been inspired by the coming out story of MLB umpire Dale Scott.


    Yet there are precious few out LGBT professional athletes, particularly men. They choose to not come out due to a host of reasons, from their own playing career to endorsement deals - they fear they could lose any or all of them if they come out. 


    Do they have a social responsibility to come out anyway? Should athetes weigh the inspiration they can provide, and the social change they can help move along, over their own personal wealth and playing career? And do their fears have any merit in the first place?

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