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  • 00:29

    Teens Talk Episode 3: Gamer's Night! Teens Talk About Games

    in Radio

    Teens Talk Radio talk about video games! Betwwen MMOs and consoles, which do you perfer? Faheem (The host) talks about both and will have some insite on both sides of the coockie. All callers welcome!

  • 00:26

    Teens Talk Episode 5: Teen sadness

    in Radio

    On episode 5 of teens talk radio, faheem talks about teen depression. he touched on this once in teen sorrow and will elaborate more on this delicate topic.

  • 00:29

    Teens Talk episode 4: Teen sorrow...

    in Radio

    HANDLE TOPIC WITH CAUTION! In this episode of Teens Talk Radio, teens will talk about suicide and depression. why are more diagnosed with depression than a decade or two ago? what is causing all the depression and anxeity that is causing these teens to want to kill themselves? the main question is... why? what are the reasons? these questions will be asked in this episode of Teens Talk Radio. 

  • 00:25

    Teens Talk Episode 1: Teens Talk about Relationships (10/7/14)

    in Radio

    Episode 1 of teens talk radio, I am your host Faheem Abdul-Karriem. Topic for discussion tonight is teens and relationship. We will talk about your loved one, your partner. And doesn't matter who you are, gay or straight, any race in the world. if your a teen or have teens you should listen in. 


    Intro to teens talk


    topic of the night


    goodnight message. 

  • 00:31

    TEENS HOMICIDE, SUICIDE AND FIREARM DEATHS

    in Social Networking

    In 2010, males ages 15 to 19 were nearly four times more likely to commit suicide, six times more likely to be victims of homicide, and eight times more likely to be involved in a firearm-related death than were females of the same age.


    IMPORTANCE


    Homicide and suicide is the second and third leading causes of death, respectively, among teen’s ages 15 to 19, after unintentional injury In 2010, firearms were the instrument of death in 85 percent of teen homicides and 40 percent of teen suicides.While non-firearm injuries result in death in only one out of every 760 cases, almost one in four youth firearm injuries are fatal.


    Although other teens are the perpetrators of many of the homicides of teens below age 18, two-thirds of the murderers are eighteen or older.] Gang involvement has been associated with many teen murders; in 2002, nearly three-quarters of teen homicides were attributed to gang violence. Although school-related homicides receive substantial media attention, in the 2009-10 school years they accounted for about one percent of all child homicides.


    Mood disorders, such as depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disease, are major risk factors for suicide among children and adolescents. One study found that more than 90 percent of children and adolescents who committed suicide had some type of mental disorder. Stressful life events and low levels of communication with parents may also be significant risk factors. Female teens are about twice as likely to attempt suicide; however, males are much more likely to actually commit suicide.

  • 01:00

    Teens and Stress

    in Youth

    Every teens knows that their lives are stressful even if the adults around them don't believe it. Join my guest Kyneitres Good, a Licensed Professional Counselor, and myself this week as we discuss common teen stresses and strategies for coping with it. 
    Common teen stressors include: 
    Home-parents, responsibilities, siblings School-class work, extracurricular activities, peer group, drugs, sex Neighborhood-gangs, violence Physical symptoms related to stress.  

  • 01:00

    THE PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECT ON TEENS AND CHILDREN WHO PARENTS ARE INCARCERATED

    in Social Networking

    On any given day in America, it is estimated that more than 1.5 million children have a parent incarcerated in a state or federal prison. And more than 10 million children are living with a parent who has come under some form of criminal justice supervision at some point in the child’s life.


    The Annie E. Casey foundation discovered the compelling needs and circumstances of children with incarcerated parents, such as:



    Since 1990, the number of female prisoners had grown by nearly 50 percent; three-quarters of incarcerated women are mothers, and two thirds have children under age 18.
    Most law enforcement agencies lack training and protocols on where to place children when a parent is arrested and, often, ultimately incarcerated.
    Approximately 10 percent of children with incarcerated mothers and 2 percent of children with incarcerated fathers are in foster care.
    There are a disparate impact on minorities, with African-American children nine times more likely and Hispanic children three times more likely than white children to have a parent in prison.
    Despite widespread statements that children with incarcerated parents are many times more likely than other children to be incarcerated as adults.
    Risk factors such as parental mental illness, parental substance abuse, family violence and poverty were present in many children’s homes and lives prior to their parents’ incarceration. 

  • 00:59

    What Can Teens and Young Adults Do To Stop Police Brutally?

    in Social Networking

    What makes police officers and the government powerless? When the American people know their rights!


    Police officers don't like to hear these words:


    "Am I free to go?"


    "I don't consent to a search."


    "I'm going to remain silent."


        You have rights during a traffic stop or any police encounter. Learn what your rights are and use them before you loose them!


    1. Safety - When being pulled over pull over to a safe place, turn off your ignition, stay in the car and keep your hands on the steering wheel. At night turn on the interior light. Keep your license, registration and proof of insurance close by like in your "sun visor."


     Immediately roll your window down all the way. Not half way, not an inch so you can speak through the crack. All the way. Among other things, it will show that you have nothing to hide.


     Be courteous, stay calm, smile and don't complain. Show respect and say things like "sir and no sir." Never bad-mouth a police officer, stay in control of your words, body language and your emotions. Keep your hands where the police officer can see them. Never touch a police officer and never run away!


     

  • 00:27

    Teens Talk Episode 2: Teens Talk about TV

    in Radio

    Anything About teens and tv is on tonight

  • 00:20

    CONVERSATION WITH A 14 YEAR OLD TEENAGE BOY ABOUT SURVIVING AS A TEENS IN TODAY

    in Social Networking

    Adolescence is a time of growth, development and change. Your teen will develop emotionally and socially as well as physically. This development may seem seamless to you, but there are distinct things happening in your teenager's social and emotional development that are helping them become who they are going to be - helping them to form their identity. While these changes don't follow a timeline to the date of your teen's birthday - your 14-year-old may still act like a 13-year-old socially - teens of different ages do have different social and emotional focuses andbehaviors. Here we have a list of them by age.


    Thirteen-year-old teens are dealing with the physical changes in their body - puberty - emotionally as well as physically. Change is not easy for most people at any age and your 13-year-old is dealing with one of the biggest changes of their lives. This will cause your young teen to feel uncertain, moody and be sensitive to what others think of them, especially their peers.   

  • 01:00

    Teens who text and drive take even more risks while driving

    in Social Networking

    More than 4 in 10 teens admit to texting while driving, and those that do are more likely to engage in other risks while driving.


     


    If your teen texts while driving, chances are he or she also practices other dangerous motor vehicle habits — including failing to buckle up and driving after they have been drinking, a new federal analysis finds.


    In 2011, 45% of all students 16 and older reported that they had texted or e-mailed while driving during the past 30 days, says the study by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and reported in June's Pediatrics, released online today.


    Teens who texted while driving were five times more likely than those who didn't to drive when they had been drinking alcohol. And the more they texted the worse their seat belt habit. Teens who texted every day while driving during the past month were more than 40% more likely to not always wear their seat belts than were teens who engaged in texting while driving once or twice in the past 30 days.


    It's not surprising that kids who take such risks in one area may be more likely to take risks in other areas, says CDC Director Thomas Frieden.


    "But the big picture is that the greatest single risk to teenagers in this country is getting hurt or killed in a motor vehicle crash; that's the most likely thing to result in their death," he says. "And texting while driving makes teen driving even more dangerous."