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  • 00:22

    Universal Healing with Gracie DeBrock

    in Spirituality

    We will start off the show with a Divine Guidance Oracle Reading for our planet Gaia. We will then take calls. Watch the video link below. Truly amazing to see a bladder tumor disappear before your eyes. It can happen, has happened and these folks were smart enough to run a sonogram machine while doing the healing.


    https://ddsdtv.blogspot.com/


    Be Well! Talk to you all tonight

  • 01:36

    Women's Rights Activist: Martha

    in Women

    Martha comes forth today talking about what brought her into the passion for the activism for women's rights, what she has done with that time frame, and what her hopes are for the future.


    When the Texas legislature passed the Sonogram Law in 2011, Martha noticed a dangerous trend of stripping Texas women of their constitutional rights. Feeling helpless to fight back, she noticed on social media in early 2012, women's rights rallies being planned in all 50 state capitals. She became part of the core group who planned the rally in Austin on April 28, 2012. Martha was also at the capitol for the special session showdown over HB2 in the summer of 2013. Her 22-year-old daughter, Kayla, testified before the House State Affairs Committee, and her own testimony was read by Senator Wendy Davis during her famous filibuster. The rally in 2012 was the catalyst for her local involvement. Less than three years after her first experience in activism, Martha will be sworn in as president of the Texas Democratic Women of Caldwell County on January 19, 2015. Her goal for the group is to have members connect with the community in an effort to re-engage their neighbors in the political process of electing leaders who will serve the people of this great state.


    To learn more about the activism and women's rights issues:


    http://facebook.com/domesticviolencevoices 


    http://facebook.com/beyondwordslive 


    http://blogtalkradio.com/oralhistory 


    and remember to keep #SharingYourVoice

  • 00:31

    Part 3: Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights cardiac sonographer Donna Hendershot

    in Health

    Turlock, CA – Every cell in the heart has the ability to initiate an impulse. Donna Hendershot began her life living in a railroad box car with no running water or plumbing. Growing up, she always dreamed of one day working in the medical field, but her family couldn’t afford to send her to nursing school. 


    At the age of 28, Donna Hendershot defied the odds, finally attending to be a medical assistant. With her foot in the door, finally, Donna resolved to learn every aspect of cardiology.


    That was over 36 years ago. Today, Donna is a retired cardiovascular sonographer. Over the course of her career, supervised all diagnostic testing at San Leandro Hospital and served as an educator, teaching hundreds of nursing students, as well as volunteers, senior citizens and nonmedical professionals, on all aspects related to the anatomy and function of the heart.


    “I don’t like to use the word retired,” says Donna. “I’m not done working. I have so much knowledge to share.”


    The heart works both electrically and mechanically. If an EKG is abnormal they will supplement that test with a sonogram. In cardiac sonography, a transducer penetrates sound into the chest, allowing physicians to look at the individual chambers of the heart and determine how well each is functioning. When you correlate a sonogram with a patient’s EKG, you have a really clear picture of what’s going on with someone’s heart.


    “It was my job to help the doctor help the patient,” says Donna. “The sonogram allows patients to know what’s going on in their bodies before it’s too late, so I loved working with patients and encouraging patients when they were going to have surgery.”

  • 00:31

    Part 4: Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights cardiac sonographer Donna Hendershot

    in Health

    Turlock, CA – Every cell in the heart has the ability to initiate an impulse. Donna Hendershot began her life living in a railroad box car with no running water or plumbing. Growing up, she always dreamed of one day working in the medical field, but her family couldn’t afford to send her to nursing school. 


    At the age of 28, Donna Hendershot defied the odds, finally attending to be a medical assistant. With her foot in the door, finally, Donna resolved to learn every aspect of cardiology.


    That was over 36 years ago. Today, Donna is a retired cardiovascular sonographer. Over the course of her career, supervised all diagnostic testing at San Leandro Hospital and served as an educator, teaching hundreds of nursing students, as well as volunteers, senior citizens and nonmedical professionals, on all aspects related to the anatomy and function of the heart.


    “I don’t like to use the word retired,” says Donna. “I’m not done working. I have so much knowledge to share.”


    The heart works both electrically and mechanically. If an EKG is abnormal they will supplement that test with a sonogram. In cardiac sonography, a transducer penetrates sound into the chest, allowing physicians to look at the individual chambers of the heart and determine how well each is functioning. When you correlate a sonogram with a patient’s EKG, you have a really clear picture of what’s going on with someone’s heart.


    “It was my job to help the doctor help the patient,” says Donna. “The sonogram allows patients to know what’s going on in their bodies before it’s too late, so I loved working with patients and encouraging patients when they were going to have surgery.”

  • 00:31

    Part 2: Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights cardiac sonographer Donna Hendershot

    in Health

    Turlock, CA – Every cell in the heart has the ability to initiate an impulse. Donna Hendershot began her life living in a railroad box car with no running water or plumbing. Growing up, she always dreamed of one day working in the medical field, but her family couldn’t afford to send her to nursing school. 


    At the age of 28, Donna Hendershot defied the odds, finally attending to be a medical assistant. With her foot in the door, finally, Donna resolved to learn every aspect of cardiology.


    That was over 36 years ago. Today, Donna is a retired cardiovascular sonographer. Over the course of her career, supervised all diagnostic testing at San Leandro Hospital and served as an educator, teaching hundreds of nursing students, as well as volunteers, senior citizens and nonmedical professionals, on all aspects related to the anatomy and function of the heart.


    “I don’t like to use the word retired,” says Donna. “I’m not done working. I have so much knowledge to share.”


    The heart works both electrically and mechanically. If an EKG is abnormal they will supplement that test with a sonogram. In cardiac sonography, a transducer penetrates sound into the chest, allowing physicians to look at the individual chambers of the heart and determine how well each is functioning. When you correlate a sonogram with a patient’s EKG, you have a really clear picture of what’s going on with someone’s heart.


    “It was my job to help the doctor help the patient,” says Donna. “The sonogram allows patients to know what’s going on in their bodies before it’s too late, so I loved working with patients and encouraging patients when they were going to have surgery.”

  • 00:31

    Close-Up Talk Radio spotlights cardiac sonographer Donna Hendershot

    in Health

    Turlock, CA – Every cell in the heart has the ability to initiate an impulse. Donna Hendershot began her life living in a railroad box car with no running water or plumbing. Growing up, she always dreamed of one day working in the medical field, but her family couldn’t afford to send her to nursing school. 


    At the age of 28, Donna Hendershot defied the odds, finally attending to be a medical assistant. With her foot in the door, finally, Donna resolved to learn every aspect of cardiology.


    That was over 36 years ago. Today, Donna is a retired cardiovascular sonographer. Over the course of her career, supervised all diagnostic testing at San Leandro Hospital and served as an educator, teaching hundreds of nursing students, as well as volunteers, senior citizens and nonmedical professionals, on all aspects related to the anatomy and function of the heart.


    “I don’t like to use the word retired,” says Donna. “I’m not done working. I have so much knowledge to share.”


    The heart works both electrically and mechanically. If an EKG is abnormal they will supplement that test with a sonogram. In cardiac sonography, a transducer penetrates sound into the chest, allowing physicians to look at the individual chambers of the heart and determine how well each is functioning. When you correlate a sonogram with a patient’s EKG, you have a really clear picture of what’s going on with someone’s heart.


    “It was my job to help the doctor help the patient,” says Donna. “The sonogram allows patients to know what’s going on in their bodies before it’s too late, so I loved working with patients and encouraging patients when they were going to have surgery.”

  • 00:57

    Spiritual Sonogram

    in Spirituality


    Preaching on speaking your vision! 

  • 00:38

    Cancer Survivors

    in Christianity

    Going through cancer treatment requires a lot of strength—physical, emotional, and mental. To stay strong, it’s important to have caregivers, both family and healthcare professionals, who continue to see you as a whole person, rather than focusing solely on the disease. I found that kind of care at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA).


    After feeling a sharp pain in my breast one night, I made an appointment to see my primary care physician in my home town of Las Vegas, Nevada. She referred me to a breast specialist in the same building. Two weeks later, a sonogram indicated that I had breast cancer, and a subsequent biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. The disease was at stage II, and my doctor recommended surgery. However, I was troubled because I was not presented with options and I was not ready to rush into a decision. I also saw an oncologist who told me to have a port placed in preparation for chemotherapy, which was not something I’d discussed with the first specialist.


    Today, I am a member of the patient support network Cancer Fighters, and I try to meet individually with patients from time to time. It is so important to stay positive. Cancer is your personal fight, and you want to win that fight. That means never giving up, and staying close with your family. At CTCA, the healthcare professionals and entire staff are like family.


    God always have a way to help his people. Let's continue to trust God at everything.


     




  • 02:00

    MISSION PREBORN

    in Culture

    The mission of saving the pre born can incorporate many things. Jaime Thietten uses her gift of singing/songwriting to move hearts for life.

    Dan Steiner is the founder of Mission Preborn strategically  helping pregnancy centers to save babies.
    Suzanne Miral with Houston Coalition For LIfe will share her experience with the mobile sonogram clinic (bus) across the street from the largest Planned Parenthood in the western hemisphere.
     

  • 01:02

    MOMocrats MOMochat: The New Hampshire Clown Car Rally

    in Politics Progressive

    MOmocrats Cynematic, Karoli, Julie Pippert and Donna Schwartz Mills debrief last night's New Hampshire primary: Mitt's Mittfulness, Newt's Newtishness, Ron Paul's squirreliness, and Rick Perry -- absent, but not forgotten. The women also touch on shifting staff in the White House, the Texas "mandatory sonogram" law, and efforts to overturn Citizens United.

  • 00:31

    House Bill 854: Abortion-a woman's right to know...or is it?

    in Blogs

    Hosted by: Nnenna Olu and Rita Asiedu
    Guests: ACLU's Katie Parker and Jimmy Dixon from the House of Representatives

    A New North Carolina legislation N.C. 90-21.85 requires the physician before performing an abortion, to perform an obstetric real –time view of the unborn child on the pregnant woman. The legislation also requires the physician to simultaneously explain what the display is depicting, which included the presence, location, and dimensions of the unborn child within the uterus and the number of unborn children depicted. The doctor may offer the pregnant woman an opportunity to hear the fetal heart tone. Additionally, the physician is required to display the images so that the pregnant woman may view them. Lastly, the physician shall obtain a written certification from the woman, before the abortion that the requirements have been complied with.
    The statute allows the father or any person upon whom an abortion has been performed may maintain an action for damages against the person who performed the abortion in knowing or reckless violation of the article. A plaintiff may also seek injunctive relief against the doctor from performing further abortions in this state.
    This legislation may be violative of the first amendment rights for several reasons:
        •    Compelled Speech by doctors {doctors must offer info even against patients wishes, even if patient tells doctor to stop, he/she must keep going otherwise they will face sanctions
        •    Compelled review of sonogram to gain consent
        •    Compelled to hear
    The First Amendment states in part that… “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press…