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  • 00:31

    Super Bowl Commerical and Jamaican Patois

    in Women

    Super Bowl Sunday will impact a a bigger explosion this year. The VW commerical's 4 million youtube hits has stirred up some interesting dialogues. The problem is that it insults some to call the ad racist, athough Jamaican's don't think its insulting; including myself (JA on paternal side). So what' the problem? When Bobby McFarren sang "Don't Worry Be Happy (1996)" in a Patois voice, no one talked. In "Trading Faces (1983)", Dan Aykroyd's character was Jamaican and no talk. So what's the hubbub now? Have we become so polically correct that we can't enjoy the voice of others? Or is it the same old story, replayed, that "the native" still cannot speak because themselves due to intellectural incapacity? We will explore these questions as I deliver my own commentary on the subject through a postcolonial anthropological lens with Michael Thomas of Caribbean Media Network blogged: The recent discussion about the 2013 VW Super Bowl Advertisement, has touched on many important factors in advertising and marketing to the Caribbean American consumer....... The statements of the Institute of Caribbean Studies and Caribbean Heritage Organization, are a direct reflection of Caribbean Americans polled on Wednesday January 29, 2013, many of whom are natives of Jamaica, now living in the United States. "As members of the Caribbean diaspora, and Jamaican, we find the commercial, amusing and indeed a fascinating example of subtlety in subliminal messaging." The ad directors clearly had a firm understanding of Jamaicans' reputation for being hardworking, yet a reputation for having a laid-back, positive, don't-worry-about-a-thing disposition through the character of the Volkswagen.These moral standards are reflected by many Caribbean American consumers, but distinctive of Jamaicans', through music, cuisine, and lifestyle, which have influenced the nation. Join us as we talk about yet another situation and the SB.

  • 00:37

    Test show

    in Radio

    The gospel to all generation

  • Peoples' Plights

    in Radio

     


     


     Please join yours truly the Herbs-Man


     As we explore ways and means in which we can reach out and help each other, as well as do what we can in order tackle the crime situation facing the Island of Jamaica, the USA, Canada, UK and other parts of the world, as well as help stop the abuse of children, the elderly and animals.


    We also provide valuable information on herbs and spices found, especially in the Island of Jamaica that can help in the treatment and prevention of most dreaded diseases.


    Thanks for tuning in.


    Please join us and well as tell a friend


     

  • 01:33

    INDIE REVIEW RADIO/ STACEY Muhammad / INDIE FILM

    in Entertainment

    Stacey M. is an award winning writer/director and producer of narrative, documentary, broadcast and digital content as well as a social activist and cultural critic who has lectured on a broad range of topics including hiphop, pop culture,media,film,social justice issues,and most notably, the history of Black women filmmakers in cinema. A native of New Orleans, LA, Stacey has worked extensively to document and preserve hip hop culture and address social issues through film and media. Her work includes multimedia projects, music videos, arts and activism and social justice campaigns and award winning films including “I AM SEAN BELL, black boys speak, which made it’s film festival premiere at the PATOIS, New Orleans International Human Rights Film Festival. An official selection to the Media That Matters Film Festival, where it was awarded the “Speaking Out Award”, the film received international acclaim and toured with the HBO/ Media that Matters Film Festival screening for audiences worldwide. Her latest project, For Colored Boys, REDEMPTION starring Rob Morgan, Julito McCullum, Tim Reid and Jacinto Taras Riddick is currently on the festival circuit. The award winning series, Executive Produced by author, journalist and social justice activist, Dr. Marc Lamont Hill is preparing for it’s second season with new cast members Charles Dutton and Adesola Osakalumi. In 2009, Stacey co-founded “Intelligent Seedz” with Artist / Activist, Wise Intelligent. The organization is committed to equipping youth with the necessary tools to tell their stories through documentary film. Stacey's work have been featured in The LA Times, Essence, Ebony, The Root, OkayPlayer, IndieWire, Shadow and Act, Colorlines, ScreenSlate, HuffPost Live and BET Online.

  • 00:58

    The Writing Rules according to . . . Elmore Leonard

    in Writing

    In this episode of Write Pack Radio, the Write Pack explores the 10 rules of writing according to the late great author Elmore Leonard:


    Never open a book with weather.


    What are some better ways to open a story?


    How should weather be used?


    Do stories explore and define humanity?


    Avoid prologues.


    Do prologues distance your readers?


     What are some other ways to get the “prologue information” into the story?


    What about the exceptions like Dune and the Lord of the Rings trilogy?


    Do readers skip reading the prologues? Do readers really need them?


    Should you never have a prologue?


    Never use a verb other than “said” to carry dialogue.


    Why?


    Does using other things sound like writing?


    What about the ones that show action?


    Never use an adverb to modify the verb “said”


    Why should adverbs be left out?


    Can they distract and interrupt?


    Are there just words that should never be used?


    Keep your exclamation points under control.


    Why?


    How many should you use them?


    Do they lose their power when they are over used?


    Never use the words “suddenly” or “all hell broke loose.”


    Is it self-explanatory?


    Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly.


    Do they make it more confusing?


    How can you use it?


    Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.


    How do you use details then?


    Don’t go into great detail describing places and things.


    What does the reader need to know?


    Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.


    The most important rule


    And the rule that binds them all: If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.

  • 01:33

    INDIE REVIEW RADIO/ STACEY Muhammad / INDIE FILM

    in Entertainment

    Stacey M. is an award winning writer/director and producer of narrative, documentary, broadcast and digital content as well as a social activist and cultural critic who has lectured on a broad range of topics including hiphop, pop culture,media,film,social justice issues,and most notably, the history of Black women filmmakers in cinema. A native of New Orleans, LA, Stacey has worked extensively to document and preserve hip hop culture and address social issues through film and media. Her work includes multimedia projects, music videos, arts and activism and social justice campaigns and award winning films including “I AM SEAN BELL, black boys speak, which made it’s film festival premiere at the PATOIS, New Orleans International Human Rights Film Festival. An official selection to the Media That Matters Film Festival, where it was awarded the “Speaking Out Award”, the film received international acclaim and toured with the HBO/ Media that Matters Film Festival screening for audiences worldwide. Her latest project, For Colored Boys, REDEMPTION starring Rob Morgan, Julito McCullum, Tim Reid and Jacinto Taras Riddick is currently on the festival circuit. The award winning series, Executive Produced by author, journalist and social justice activist, Dr. Marc Lamont Hill is preparing for it’s second season with new cast members Charles Dutton and Adesola Osakalumi. In 2009, Stacey co-founded “Intelligent Seedz” with Artist / Activist, Wise Intelligent. The organization is committed to equipping youth with the necessary tools to tell their stories through documentary film. Stacey's work have been featured in The LA Times, Essence, Ebony, The Root, OkayPlayer, IndieWire, Shadow and Act, Colorlines, ScreenSlate, HuffPost Live and BET Online.

  • 00:37

    THE JROWDY REPORT

    in Entertainment


    Stay tuned for updates on Farahri: Concerts/Shows, Single Releases, Video Releases, Television Appearances and all other projects!
    Biography
    International pop sensation Farahri, is quickly gaining attention as one of the most sought after singers and performers for her catchy songs and electrifying stage presence.

    A ferocious musical talent, Farahri blends her own unique style of Pop along with the best of Dance, R&B, Hip-Hop, Reggae/Dancehall and Hindi Pop. 
    However, Farahri’s’ abilities as a vocal powerhouse do not only transcend musical genres. Able to sing in English, French, Spanish, Hindi, Swahili and Jamaican Patois, Farahri makes fans out of any audience with her mesmerizing performances; a true representative of the international music scene.
     

  • 01:58

    Notch Joins Us Today Live!!!

    in Comedy

    Norman Howell (born May 11, 1973, Hartford, Connecticut), better known as Notch, is an R&B, reggae, dancehall and reggaeton artist. He was the former lead vocalist and one of the creative force behind the hip hop-reggae act,Born Jamericans. He grew up in a multicultural neighborhood. Notch learned how to speak Spanish because most of his friends at that time were of Hispanic descent. Notch is fluent in American English, Jamaican Patois, and Spanish. Some songs can be heard with him mixing all three, a mixture he calls 'Spatoinglish'.  He has worked with Daddy Yankee, Luny Tunes, Voltio, Baby Ranks, Thievery Corporation, Sublime, Pitbull, T-Weaponz and Rascalz. Notch provided the vocals on the songs "The Richest Man in Babylon", "Amerimacka" and "Blasting Through the City" produced by Thievery Corporation. 

  • 02:00

    Glideascope Stylings like Jamaican Patois, Downtempo, Electronica

    in Music

     Glideascope tangles computers, intriguing samples, and orchestral composition to make music for this digital age. With sounds as lush as classical composer Pachelbel on one track and up tempo Jamaican Patois vocals driving the next, this is a true kaleidoscope of sound.

    You will enjoy the versatility in his music ranging from Jamaican Patois, Downtempo, Electronica and so much more. It's an awesome fusion of culture and world music.

    'The best person to define the work is Glideascope himself. He calls his music, “The soundtrack for a movie never created.” Hearing it brings to mind some visually stunning films like Blade Runner, The Last Samurai, and Cry Freedom.'

    Please imagine for a moment the scene, feelings and impact of this event: Glideascope was riding on the underground train a few metres away from one that was blown up in a terrorist attack. With the horrific images from the London Bombings of July 7th 2005 seared in his mind, Glideascope retreated. He reflected and tried to find meaning. When he finally returned home to music, he was stunned to find over 4,000 messages from devoted fans on his My Space page. He started to think that maybe he was on the right path after all. Maybe his music did have a bigger purpose.

    So, sit back relax have a cup of coffee, tea, or a glass of wine. Enjoy some good conversation and music. It's Wednesday time to kick back and refresh for the week...

  • 00:39

    Interrogating Attitudes Towards Language in Jamaica

    in Education

    In the first episode of the JC2701 Radio, students Johnathan, Pamela and Marissa, discuss how language attitudes took shape in Jamaica and the kinds of ways these attitudes are expressed. The panelists also compare and contrast the attitudes towards one aspect of the culture in another society. 

  • 02:01

    NEWDradio: Creole, Pidgin, Patois, Oh My!

    in Culture

    NEWDradio talks to a Gabriel Arana, a trained linguist and journalist, to discuss the evolution of sub-languages like creoles, pidgins and patois. Although downplayed by mainstream society, why are these language forms legitimate to the people who speak them? Call in with YOUR dialect on the spot at 646.727.1706. As always, culture vulture co-hosts, including NEWDmagazine.com's managing editor Tiffani Knowles, dish about art, music, film, trends, politics and spirituality -- all from the fresh, edgy twentysomething perspective.

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