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  • 02:02

    Hope Road The Movie : An Expose on Human Trafficing With Susan Cook

    in Spirituality

    SUSAN C. COOK (Producer) www.littlewolfproductions.org
    A project manager for 15 years, Susan has worked on numerous projects which involve complex management skills. Her work has encompassed systems development, international conferences, and interfaith service projects. She believes that she was given this project as a mission from the Divine Feminine because we can't turn our backs on children. Susan's work provides a shocking look at a tragic issue.


    Human trafficking


    Human trafficking is a planet wide epidemic. With the ease of travel, human beings are trafficked throughout the world and children are the most lucrative in this multi-billion dollar business. This film focuses on the plight of children between the ages of ten and sixteen. These children have been abandoned, literally thrown out of the home of one or both parents, left behind when parents move on, or flee abusive situations so intense that the unknown is risked rather than face mutilation and death. With the collaboration of the FBI, KBI, some of the victims, and numerous law enforcement agents and lawmakers, the movie weaves the story concisely so as not to spend too much time on the problem.


    When children are found in this kind of situation, authorities don’t know what to do with them. Often they tell them to go home but there is no home to go to and no rehabilitation offered, ultimately no options except to go back into the hands of a pimp. The need for rehabilitation homes and centers for these fragile young people is at a critical juncture. The estimates of 100,000 to 300,000 missing children in the United States alone creates enough need in every major city to fund and staff rehab centers. Sadly, the silent and horrendous abuse that is suffered can take a lifetime to overcome.


    Please join us for this timely and provocative topic.

  • 02:11

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Org. Demand More Pardons, July 31, 2015

    in Politics Progressive

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Org. Demand More Pardons. Call-in (347)857.3293 to discuss the need for more pardons and paroles in Florida and other states. Diaz demands release of all inmates after serving minimum sentences unless authorities show reason to assume the release of a given inmate would present a danger to society. The Human Conflicts Org. also demands the release of elderly and dying inmates who would present no danger to society. Taxpayers are being burdened with paying to continue incarcerating rehabilitated prisoners, elderly prisoners, dying inmates, and persons who were convicted on nonviolent offenses whose release would not have any negative impact on society whatsoever. 

  • 00:59

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Org. Demand More Paroles June 26, 2015

    in Politics Progressive

    Mary Diaz on the "Huaman Rights Demand" radio broadcast. Mary is a prisoner activist who advocates for paroles and pardons. Tell us your opinion by calling (347)857-3293, or you can listen by computer live or hear the archived tape 24/7. Diaz is affiliated with "Human Conflicts," and "LET MY PEOPLE GO" is the motto. Mary lives in Florida, which had over 5,200 inmates who were parole eligible in 2014 but only released 18. Prison investors on Pardons and Parole Boards are a barrier to freedom for many rehabilitated inmates, I think. 

    Diaz said Alabama's Pardon and Parole Board has become a trendsetter for the rest of the country regarding releases. In Alabama during 2014, the Board considered 6,647 paroles, of which 2,237 were granted. The Board granted 657 pardons of 798 pardons heard and processed 522 voter rights restorations. That is real progress against mass incarceration. Some of the change may be credited to the ?Southern Poverty Law Center's lawsuit against the Alabama prison system.

    "Presently, Maynard Cooper & Gale is fighting a Southern Poverty Law Center lawsuit that claims the health care provided to Alabama's inmates is inadequate and unconstitutional. Correctional health care firm Corizon is paying the firm to fight the lawsuit on behalf of the state due to a provision in its $224 million contract with the state. In total, the state has spent $1.86 million in taxpayer money to fight prison lawsuits in the past four years." reports AL(dot) com. That sum likely also includes a lawsuit by the ‎ACLU? for segregating inmates with HIV. Righteous lawsuits litigated in just courts matter.

    January is our month for new beginnings. We'll discuss pardons, paroles, and successful re-entry this month at Human Rights Demand and at National Network in Action (NNIA1). Please participate!

  • 02:00

    Human Trafficing

    in Youth

    This gorgeous little girl, Shaniya Davis who was only 5 years old, ... Please join me in our prayers for Shaniya and all the other children of this nation. Tonights discussion will be focused around the topic of Human Trafficing

  • 00:45

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Org Demand More Paroles 05/15/2015

    in Politics Progressive

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Org Demand More Paroles. They also demand compassionate releases for sick and elderly inmates, relief from excessive sentencing, and new trials for people with late-arriving evidence of innocence. 

    Power concedes nothing without a demand; it never has, and it never will. ~Frederick Douglass

  • 02:18

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Org, 6/19/15, Demanding More Paroles

    in Politics Progressive

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Organization demand more pardons and paroles, especially among inmates who have served their minimum sentences every Friday at 3pmEST. Call-in at (347)857.3293. They also demand compassionate releases for sick and elderly inmates, relief from excessive sentencing, and new trials for people with late-arriving evidence of innocence.

    Diaz reports that inmates are imprisoned for years and even decades beyond their minimum sentences and that paroles are sometimes being revoked on false allegations. For instance, one man's parole was revoked based on the falsehood that he had moved without giving the Florida DOC a new address, when the man had not moved. He was working for a hotel company doing heating and air repairs and would often need to stay out of town. He presented proof that he had not moved by receipts from utility companes and affidavits from his neighbors, but apparently the prison needed someone with his skills as a free laborer. The man is now 74 years of age and had been released from prison for 19 years, living a peaceful, productive life but was re-imprisoned based on a lie and a fraud on taxpayers who pay roughly $20,000 per year to imprison this innocent man.

    The Pardons and Paroles Board often rejects parole for inmates without giving any reason having to do with community safety. Americans pay over $100 billion to warehouse prisoners, most of whom are incarcerated for nonviolent offenses, which boosts prison profits for private prison investors in government positions, including legislators, Justice Department personnel, judges, prosecutors, crime lab technicians, pardons and parole board members, and even defense attorneys. Stop conflicts of interest by demanding that nobody who works in criminal justice positions or their spouses and children may own private prison stock

  • 00:31

    Talk to the Twins live with Colleen Garey Human Hair wefting Guru

    in Women

    The first is Colleen Garey, widely known as the human hair and wefting guru. Through her company, I.R.I.Extensions, the leading hair manufacturing and distribution company nationally and internationally, her current and past clients include World Cup Tennis Player Serena Williams, Raymone Bain, former publicist to Michael Jackson, CNN, MSNBC, and more. Colleen has been able to remain successful in the hair business, beyond hair styling, for over 15 years. 


    With Colleen's hair wefting training classes, she offers the opportunity to potentially make a seven figure annual salary.

  • 02:15

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Org Demand More Paroles and Pardons 06/05/2015

    in Politics Progressive

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Organization demand more pardons and paroles, especially among inmates who have served their minimum sentences every Friday at 3pmEST. Call-in at (347)857.3293. They also demand compassionate releases for sick and elderly inmates, relief from excessive sentencing, and new trials for people with late-arriving evidence of innocence. 

    Diaz reports that inmates are imprisoned for years and even decades beyond their minimum sentences and that paroles are sometimes being revoked on false allegations. For instance, one man's parole was revoked based on the falsehood that he had moved without giving the Florida DOC a new address, when the man had not moved. He was working for a hotel company doing heating and air repairs and would often need to stay out of town. He presented proof that he had not moved by receipts from utility companes and affidavits from his neighbors, but apparently the prison needed someone with his skills as a free laborer. The man is now 74 years of age and had been released from prison for 19 years, living a peaceful, productive life but was re-imprisoned based on a lie and a fraud on taxpayers who pay roughly $20,000 per year to imprison this innocent man.


    The Pardons and Paroles Board often rejects parole for inmates without giving any reason having to do with community safety. Americans pay over $100 billion to warehouse prisoners, most of whom are incarcerated for nonviolent offenses, which boosts prison profits for private prison investors in government positions, including legislators, Justice Department personnel, judges, prosecutors, crime lab technicians, pardons and parole board members, and even defense attorneys. Stop conflicts of interest by demanding that nobody who works in criminal justice positions or their spouses and children may own private prison stock.

  • 02:00

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Org Demand More Paroles 04/24/2015

    in Politics Progressive

    Mary Diaz is a human rights advocate in Florida. She and Human Conflicts Org. advocate for the release of inmates who have served their minimum sentences unless the boards of pardons and paroles can show that release of the inmates would pose a security risk. Call (347)857-3293 to dialogue with Mary Diaz and her guests each Friday at 3pmEST. They also advocate for the wrongly convicted, people who were overly sentenced, and compassionate releases for elderly and sick inmates.

    On April 17, Diaz's guests included one man who was released from death row and another man who won release after decades in prison. Both were innocent. Hear that broadcast at the link below, which is archived at Blogtalkradio.
    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/humanrightsdemand/2015/04/17/mary-diaz-and-human-conflicts-org-demand-more-paroles-04172015

    You are invited to assist Human Conflicts Organization in activism for prisoner's rights by sharing the links for Mary Diaz's broadcasts, which remain available at "Human Rights Demand" channel for later listening. View the channel's entire schedule at http://MLJradio.blogspot.com

    Power concedes nothing without a demand; it never has, and it never will. ~Frederick Douglass

  • 02:04

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Organization demand more paroles 05/29/15

    in Politics Progressive

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Organization demand more paroles 05/29/15 - Phone 347.857.3293 to participate on the live show between 3pm and 5pm EST on May 29, 2015. The tape will be archived at Blogtalkradio for future listening any time, 24/7.

  • 00:45

    Mary Diaz Human Conflicts Org 05/14/2015

    in Politics Progressive

    Mary Diaz and Human Conflicts Organization demand more paroles. Call in at (347)857.3293. They also advocate for compassionate releases for inmates whose health has deteriorated to the point that they cannot pose any community risk and for elderly inmates. Diaz and Human Conflicts Organization also fight for release of prisoners who were wrongfully convicted and excessively sentenced. Diaz and Human Conflicts Organization provide reentry services to help released Florida inmates get reacclimated into society.