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  • 01:58

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    The show today will be about PrEP and I really want many of you to take part in this discussion. Join us to bring awareness to the community. Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV. HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection. HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities. Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 01:00

    How Is HIV Depicted in the Media?

    in LGBT

    HIV in Prime Time


    We all wish that more stories about HIV were featured in the media. With 1.2 million people in the US living with HIV, it's fair to say that there should be more HIV-positive characters represented on TV. But, when we do hear stories about HIV, are we always happy with them? With two recent high-profile television shows – HBO's Looking and ABC's How to Get Away With Murder – featuring HIV-positive gay characters, now's the time to ask: "How should HIV be represented on TV?" This week, we discuss media representations of HIV, how they've grown over time, and where we wish they could go.


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton.


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 

  • 02:01

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awareness to the community. Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV. HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection. HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities. Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 01:40

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    I will get this time right soon. 7:30 tonight not 7pm. The show will be about HIV, dating and sex a subject that needs to be talked about. There are so many questions people have about HIV and sex and why some are afraid to have sex or even just date a person with HIV. If there's anyone that has any questions on this subject please inbox me to let me know you'll call in to be on the show tonight. And you can't say you don't have questions because everyone does. Get the knowledge about it at 7:30 pm. Educate yourself family and friends. Knowledge is power. 

  • 02:02

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awareness to the community. Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV. HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection. HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities. Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:00

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awareness to the community. Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV. HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection. HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities. Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 01:01

    Gay Men, Substance Use and HIV

    in LGBT

    Gay men use alcohol and other drugs at a disproportionately higher rate than the rest of the population. Gay men use for a variety of reasons from coping with mental health issues to just seeking fun. However, at the intersection of mental illness is often a high risk for HIV infection. This week, we'll be discussing the many reasons gay men use substances. We'll also talk to some men who have a history of substance use and have since started on the road to recovery. 


    You can follow Positive Radio Network on Twitter at @PRNTweets. 


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton. 


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 

  • 02:02

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:05

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:28

    CURE (HIV Viral Remission) Commentary

    in LGBT

    We have all seen the reports flying across social media about a new "cure" for HIV. As a person living with HIV and as an activist, these reports drive me crazy since they are sensationalized stories used for click-bait. Media outlets know that using a keyword such as "cure" will increase the amount of traffic to there sight and so forth. I for one think that we need to remove the word "cure" from our vocabulary completely. The current state of HIV research has shown that the more we learn about HIV, the more we learn that we do not know..


    Everyone wants a "cure" however what is the current state of effrots in the United States to pressure law makers, big pharma and so on to actually push even further into "cure" research? When was the last time that you went to a rally for an "HIV Cure"?


    It is my opinion that each one of us must hold the media and each other accountable for recklessly throwing the c-word around. Every time the word "cure" is used, it relays that this eipdemic is over. This epidemic will not be over until we have zero new-infection. This epidemic will not be over until we have zero mother-to-child transmission (a goal that we are close to reaching).


    www.medicaldaily.functional-hiv-cure-step-closer-reality-fda-approval-clinical-human-trials-325048

  • 01:17

    Sex, HIV, and the little blue pill.

    in Lifestyle

    Are people tired of talking about HIV, or is there still interest in the global pandemic. Are women being overlooked and gay men the continued focal point? Do people still fear becoming infected? What if there was a pill you could take to prevent HIV infection? 


    I will be joined by co-hosts Nicole Vick, Percy Pandy, and Bridgette Picou in a conversation about HIV, sex, women, and a new HIV prevention tool called PrEP* (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). Learn about what's new in the fight; its impact on the community; and what concerns are in existence. 


    *Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a prevention option for people who are at high risk of getting HIV. It’s meant to be used consistently, as a pill taken every day, and to be used with other prevention options such as condoms. For more info go to: http://prepfacts.org/