• 01:00

    How Is HIV Depicted in the Media?

    in LGBT

    HIV in Prime Time


    We all wish that more stories about HIV were featured in the media. With 1.2 million people in the US living with HIV, it's fair to say that there should be more HIV-positive characters represented on TV. But, when we do hear stories about HIV, are we always happy with them? With two recent high-profile television shows – HBO's Looking and ABC's How to Get Away With Murder – featuring HIV-positive gay characters, now's the time to ask: "How should HIV be represented on TV?" This week, we discuss media representations of HIV, how they've grown over time, and where we wish they could go.


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton.


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 

  • 01:01

    Gay Men, Substance Use and HIV

    in LGBT

    Gay men use alcohol and other drugs at a disproportionately higher rate than the rest of the population. Gay men use for a variety of reasons from coping with mental health issues to just seeking fun. However, at the intersection of mental illness is often a high risk for HIV infection. This week, we'll be discussing the many reasons gay men use substances. We'll also talk to some men who have a history of substance use and have since started on the road to recovery. 


    You can follow Positive Radio Network on Twitter at @PRNTweets. 


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton. 


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 

  • 00:28

    CURE (HIV Viral Remission) Commentary

    in LGBT

    We have all seen the reports flying across social media about a new "cure" for HIV. As a person living with HIV and as an activist, these reports drive me crazy since they are sensationalized stories used for click-bait. Media outlets know that using a keyword such as "cure" will increase the amount of traffic to there sight and so forth. I for one think that we need to remove the word "cure" from our vocabulary completely. The current state of HIV research has shown that the more we learn about HIV, the more we learn that we do not know..


    Everyone wants a "cure" however what is the current state of effrots in the United States to pressure law makers, big pharma and so on to actually push even further into "cure" research? When was the last time that you went to a rally for an "HIV Cure"?


    It is my opinion that each one of us must hold the media and each other accountable for recklessly throwing the c-word around. Every time the word "cure" is used, it relays that this eipdemic is over. This epidemic will not be over until we have zero new-infection. This epidemic will not be over until we have zero mother-to-child transmission (a goal that we are close to reaching).


    www.medicaldaily.functional-hiv-cure-step-closer-reality-fda-approval-clinical-human-trials-325048

  • 01:17

    Sex, HIV, and the little blue pill.

    in Lifestyle

    Are people tired of talking about HIV, or is there still interest in the global pandemic. Are women being overlooked and gay men the continued focal point? Do people still fear becoming infected? What if there was a pill you could take to prevent HIV infection? 


    I will be joined by co-hosts Nicole Vick, Percy Pandy, and Bridgette Picou in a conversation about HIV, sex, women, and a new HIV prevention tool called PrEP* (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). Learn about what's new in the fight; its impact on the community; and what concerns are in existence. 


    *Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a prevention option for people who are at high risk of getting HIV. It’s meant to be used consistently, as a pill taken every day, and to be used with other prevention options such as condoms. For more info go to: http://prepfacts.org/


     

  • 02:11

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:08

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:58

    HIV Activist Arrest Goes Viral...

    in LGBT

    As reported on several media outlets including ProjectQ and ImstillJosh a South Carolina HIV activist has been arrested and accused of non-disclosure. On February 19, 2015 Orr was arrested by the Oconee County Sheriff's Office. Public Information Officer Jimmy Watt reported, "The Sheriff's Office began its investigation after an officer spoke with the victim on February 5th. The victim revealed to the officer that he had unprotected sex with Orr on two occasions, December 11th and December 15th of 2014, at the Fairfield Road address. The victim told deputies that he later learned that Orr was HIV positive. Investigators determined that Orr was HIV positive prior to having sex with the victim but did not notify him of such. Warrants, which were being onstained on February 19th, charging Orr with two counts of exposing another to the HIV virus, involve only one victim."


    In this epoisode Activist Aaron M. Laxton and Mathew K. Rodriguez discuss HIV and the issues regarding this case as well as what HIV Criminalization looks like Nationally.


    You can find out more about HIV Criminalization by visiting The Sero Project and you may find Robert Suttles online on Twitter @i_suttle You may also visit HIV is NOT a Crime


    Sound off and let us know what your thoughts are...


    Aaron M. Laxton @aaronlaxton


    Mathew K. Rodriguez @mathewrodriguez


    Since the original air date a campaign has been started by Josh Robbin tilted #isupporrt on social media. 


     


     


     

  • 00:32

    Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas

    in Women

    On March 10th at 2pm Eastern, the NLN will be hosting a Blog Talk Radio titled Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas: Strategies that Work. This 30 minute discussion will feature Latina activists who will talk about the intersections of violence against women and girls and HIV/AIDS from a culturally specific perspective.  

  • 01:10

    The Church gave me HIV.

    in Lifestyle

    In honor of World AIDS Day myself and co-host Chris Wilson will discuss living with HIV from a real-life perspective. How would the rates of HIV infection differ if the church were more involved and provided well rounded sex education to its youth? Should the church distribute condoms? How many Christians would be HIV negative if they were told more about sex than "Do it before marriage and go to hell"? Join us for a real and raw discussion about sex, stigma, homophobia and the responsibilities of the church.

  • 01:00

    Our Viral Lives: Young Activists Discuss HIV/AIDS

    in LGBT

    Unfortunately, some people believe that HIV/AIDS is over. Many of us know better. While the leaders of the early movement are very visibile to some -- names like Peter Staley and Mark Harrington come to mind -- some are unsure about who will be leading the movement of tomorrow. More importantly, what will the HIV/AIDS epidemic look like in the future? Today, we will speak with four young activists who recently presented at New York City's LGBT Center about their work as young HIV/AIDS activists. We will talk with Kyle Bella, the founder of Our Viral Lives, a digital narrative project, Martez Smith, an HIV+ black public health student, Kia Labeija an artist and photographer and a part of New York City's famed House of Labeija and Charlie Ferrusi, an MPH student who hopes to enter the world of government work and make advocacy for underrepresented populations his focus. 


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton. 

  • 01:33

    National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

    in Health

    This year, February 7, 2015 marks the 15th year for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD). This is a national HIV testing and treatment community mobilization initiative targeted at Blacks in the United States and the Diaspora. The Black Aids Institute is the only organization that focuses their attention solely on black people with HIV/AIDS. This year there are some shocking findings and scientific evidence that speak about treatment and opportunities in the black community when it comes to the HIV/AIDs epidemic.National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is a call for Black American to recognize that HIV is indeed a Black phenomenon & the reality that HIV disproportionately affects Black people and especially Black men who have sex with men (MSM) and Black women. Hank Millbourne will discuss information about the number of Black MSM diagnosed with HIV and the myth of black men and how they engage in sex. Hank will also talk about how the community should educate themselves, become more involved, and know what their status is and if you are infected to get treated. 

Join Host Live Chats