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  • 01:00

    FUGITIVE RADIO and LIVE interview with ETHNIC DECSENT

    in Music

    FUGITIVE RADIO playing all the new underground and mainstream rap/hiphop/r&b, and also a live interview with underground hip hop artist Ethnic Decsent!

  • 00:28

    Plan for Fitness Talk Show

    in Radio

    Bounty Hunter Scott Bernstein will be a returning guest on the show.


    Topic of discussion human trafficking, terrorism, and fugitive recovery.

  • 00:56

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor  (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • 01:00

    FUGITIVE RADIO #1 for rap/hiphop/r&b and live interview with hiphop artist WORDSMITH

    in Music

    FUGITIVE RADIO hosted by ARSEN and P1. The #1 online radio station for underground/mainstream rap/hiphop/r&b. Also live interview with hiphop artists WORDSMITH. He will be talking about his new projects, mixtapes, shows, doing features etc.

  • Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • 01:01

    Lit(erally) Speak(ing) with Patti Shene

    in Christianity

    Author Ada Brownell’s brand is “Stick-to-your-soul encouragement.” She has an extensive writing history that began at age 15 and has spent many years as a reporter for The Pueblo Chieftain.
     
    Join us Tuesday, April 7th at 8:00 AM MDT on Literally Speaking as host Patti Shene talks with Ada about her faith Find out how her brand is reflected in every work she creates, from Imagine the Future You, a Bible study for teens to her latest release, The Lady Fugitive, a historical novel..

  • 03:02

    Tarhaka presents Law vs public policy

    in Current Events

    Special guest Chief Paul Murray


     


    Don't miss this powerful broadcast


     


    Employment with the Dept. of Justice as a Deputy U.S Marshal, his primary jurisdiction nationwide in conducting and investigating felon fugitive matters involving escaped federal prisoners, probation, parole, and bond default violators, and warrants generated by Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations and certain other related felony cases. Domestic Criminal Investigations,Fugitive Task Forces, International    Investigations, Electronic Surveillance   Unit provides covert support such as telephone monitoring, electronic tracking and audio-video recording. Analytical Support Unit   researches  information during fugitive investigations and also oversees the Warrant Information Network, Protecting the Courts Providing personal protection to federal judges, court officials, witnesses,Prisoner Custody and Transportation of individuals arrested by all federal agencies and responsible for the housing and transportation of prisoners from the time they are brought into federal custody until they are either acquitted or incarcerated. Prisoner Medical Care, Witness Security provides for the security, health, and safety of government witnesses, and their immediate dependents. http://www.newdebtelimination.com

  • 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Finance

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     

  • 01:01

    Americas Most Unwanted and The People Who Find Them

    in Legal

    Our weekly look at the Bail Bond world. Well one fugitive from justice is now enjoying three squares and a warm bed. The Bruce Wilkinson story is a great one. To quote one of the agents involved.


    How to catch a fugitive that has resources and 4 million dollars at his disposal and you only have enough fuel for one pass, money to eat one more meal, and you may have to sleep in your vehicle ?
    Out smarted, out gunned, and out financed, how can you still win?
    Tune in today at 3:pm for some insights and how the professional pick up guys do it.


     

  • 00:49

    Black Abolitionists, Book by Benjamin Quarles Chapter 9 Vigilance Committe

    in Education

    Black Abolitionists, Book by Benjamin Quarles Chapter 9 Vigilance Committe


    Noted historian, scholar, and educator Benjamin Author Quarles was born in Boston, Massachusetts on January 23, 1904. 


    A prolific writer, Quarles published ten books, twenty-three major articles, and hundreds of shorter pieces of various sorts.  At least four of his books attained national significance:  Frederick Douglass (1948), which grew out of his doctoral research and remains the authoritative source for most of what is known about Douglass; The Negro in the American Revolution (1961), one of the first books to demonstrate the importance of including African Americans in the mainstream narratives of U.S. history; The Negro in the Making of America (1964), a text used in courses throughout the country; and Black Abolitionists (1969), a book that helped propel a major reassessment of the anti-slavery movement. 


    David Ruggles advocated for self-defense and the need for African Americans to organize and establish their own "remedy" for justice. In 1835, Ruggles and other black abolitionists formed the Committee of Vigilance (A hybrid of The Black Panthers and The NAACP) to protect free blacks and recently escaped slaves and to fight slave catchers and kidnappers.


    As David Ruggles, a leading black abolitionist, made clear in this 1836 account of a kidnapping, African Americans could not count on the police, the courts, or anti-slavery organizations.


    Richard Riker (Rikers Island named after him) [1773-1842]
    A lawyer and eventual judge who saw us on the lowest social level possible. Adipta writes, "When seven-year-old schoolboy Henry Scott was seized as a fugitive slave from his classroom, the kidnappers forcibly brought the terrified child before Richard Riker, the magistrate of New York City. They claimed that the boy was property belonging to white slaver.