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  • 02:02

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:05

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:33

    Rock Hudson's Physician, Dr. Michael Gottlieb, Honored by Desert AIDS Project

    in Current Events

    The 2015 Science and Medicine Award was presented to Dr. Michael Gottlieb, a physician and immunologist best known for his identification of AIDS as a new disease with the first diagnoses in June 1981. Gottlieb was famously Rock Hudson’s doctor, following the actor’s AIDS diagnosis until his death in 1985, as well as physician to the namesake of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, which shares with Desert AIDS Project the distinction of being named a “Top 20 HIV/AIDS Charity” for both 2013 and 2014.


    Nicholas Snow (with guest co-host Kristin Johnson) is thrilled to present a seven-part comprehensive series documenting the 2015 Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards held February 9th at the Palm Springs Convention Center, raising $1.3 million for direct client services at Desert AIDS Project. Special thanks to the gala producer Momentous Events for helping us secure the audio.

  • 02:11

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:08

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:34

    13-Year-Old Singer Shines at Humanitarian Awards Benefiting Desert AIDS Project

    in Current Events

    "Graham Berger Sacks, a young man of 13 years, played keyboard and sang an original song he had written for the event, "Something You Can Do." His tenderness and sweet voice added a heartwarming touch to the celebration, resulting in a standing ovation. Sacks, by the way, is the grandson of philanthropists Barbara and Jerry Keller," reported Alexis Hunter for The Desert Sun.  Also, in this episode, the Kellers on the red carpet, plus powerful speeches by co-chairs Jim Casey and Barbara Keller.


    Nicholas Snow (with guest co-host Kristin Johnson) is thrilled to present a seven-part comprehensive series documenting the 2015 Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards held February 9th at the Palm Springs Convention Center, raising $1.3 million for direct client services at Desert AIDS Project. Special thanks to the gala producer Momentous Events for helping us secure the audio.

  • 00:32

    Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas

    in Women

    On March 10th at 2pm Eastern, the NLN will be hosting a Blog Talk Radio titled Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas: Strategies that Work. This 30 minute discussion will feature Latina activists who will talk about the intersections of violence against women and girls and HIV/AIDS from a culturally specific perspective.  

  • 01:00

    Our Viral Lives: Young Activists Discuss HIV/AIDS

    in LGBT

    Unfortunately, some people believe that HIV/AIDS is over. Many of us know better. While the leaders of the early movement are very visibile to some -- names like Peter Staley and Mark Harrington come to mind -- some are unsure about who will be leading the movement of tomorrow. More importantly, what will the HIV/AIDS epidemic look like in the future? Today, we will speak with four young activists who recently presented at New York City's LGBT Center about their work as young HIV/AIDS activists. We will talk with Kyle Bella, the founder of Our Viral Lives, a digital narrative project, Martez Smith, an HIV+ black public health student, Kia Labeija an artist and photographer and a part of New York City's famed House of Labeija and Charlie Ferrusi, an MPH student who hopes to enter the world of government work and make advocacy for underrepresented populations his focus. 


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton. 

  • 01:34

    JFK, Aids, People's Temple, GMOs, Ebola, Monsanto: How Are These Connected?

    in Politics Progressive

    Say what? How can this be? Strange as it may seem, they are connected. This is why even after 50 years the government and media have to keep the "lone assassin" front up. I mean, they cannot even open the JFK assassination up even just a little bit, and they never will. It would open up an endless can of worms!!


    Tune in and call in, let's talk!

  • 01:01

    Liberal Fix Radio with HIV/AIDS Dr. Susan Ball

    in Politics Progressive

    This episode features a pre-recorded interview with Medical Doctor Susan Ball. She is author of Voices in the Band: a Doctor, her patients, and how the outlook on AIDS care changed from doomed to hopeful.


    Hosted by sociologist Keith Brekhus from Montana along with Liberal Fix Producer Naomi Minogue.  Every week the two of them feature a special guest and/or tackle tough issues with a perspective that comes from outside the beltway.


    If you are interested in being a guest and for any other inquiries or comments concerning the show please contact our producer Naomi De Luna Minogue via email: naomi@liberalfixradio.com


    Join the Liberal Fix community, a like-minded group of individuals dedicated to promoting progressive ideals and progressive activists making a difference.

  • 00:30

    Maria Davis-Premier Promoter- Aids Activist

    in Women

    Maria began a professional modeling career at the uncommon age of twenty-one in the early eighties—when black faces were rarely seen in magazines. But it was Maria’s true love of Black music that led her to her professional calling. Having a keen eye for talent and with the help of mentors, she became known as one of New York’s premiere promoters. Maria created the legendary M.A.D. Wednesday’s music showcases which continues to provide venues for signed and unsigned R&B and hip-hop artists and comedians who had no other performance options In 1995 Maria’s life took a turn when she contracted the HIV virus unknowingly from her soon-to-be-husband. Along with keeping her M.A.D. Wednesday showcases going strong, Maria dedicates her life as an HIV/AID’s activist.  She regularly speaks to educators, health care providers, ministers and social workers regarding HIV/AIDS awareness and sensitivity including being the key note speaker for the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS. She has appeared on numerous radio and television shows including WBLS, MTV and BET and has been honored by many including; New York Urban League, National Black Commission and Trailblazer Award to name a few. Maria is a mother of two and continues paying it forward.