• 00:14

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Vanessa Calloway

    in Food

    Actress Vanessa Bell Calloway has a secret weapon when it comes to holiday entertaining—her mommy!  Beverly Bell, whose daughter played Denzel Washington’s wife in Crimson Tide, and appeared opposite Angela Bassett in What’s Love Got to Do with It, offers tips on turning her small, senior-living apartment in a festive venue. “I put a red table cloth along my kitchen countertop and use one end of the counter as the buffet area,” she tells the host of That’s So Very Vanessa. “That works out well because the electrical outlets are right there, so I can plug in all the warmers without having to string extension cords around the dining room. And on the other end of the counter, I set up the bar—bottles, glasses, ice are all right there near the buffet spread.”

  • 00:12

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Caterina Borg

    in Food

    Caterina “Kitty Cat” Borg doesn’t like to waste anything during holiday-entertaining season—not even her centerpieces. “We always wanna do something that’s going to be the highlight of your table.  Of course we don’t want to always do artificial things—as great as it is to put out a bouquet of flowers. But how cool is it to make something that people can eat off of, and you can reuse it at a Thanksgiving or Christmas or New Year’s party?” the pastery chef tells Brilliant Ideas Radio host Hank Bob. “Have you ever made rock sugar? Well, it makes for beautiful centerpieces. A few years back, it became very chic, and you’d see it served in high-end hotels on the side of coffee and tea. And the rock-sugar centerpiece is a good one because it requires no baking. If you do like to bake, I’ve got another one that’s made of red-velvet cupcakes and with white-chocolate stars that’s just as easy and doesn’t take much time at all.”

  • 00:01

    Entertainment is Entertaining

    in Pop Culture

    Just some things I did. 

  • 00:16

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Amy Jurist

    in Food

    Have 2 Cruise's Helen Brahms wants to take a bit of the pressure off holiday entertaining this year, so hosts and hostesses can avoid pulling out their hair. “The number one thing I always tells people is, don’t try and do it all yourself. If you have the money, hire a caterer,” says Chef Amy Jurist. “That’ll give you an opportunity to enjoy your party and your friends, while ensuring the food is fabulous. But if you don’t have a budget for a caterer and you want to do the cooking yourself, at least hire a dishwasher/server. That way, you won’t have to sit in the kitchen and wash all the glasses afterwards. And the caterer’s rule of thumb is one helper for every 10 guests at a party. So if you’re trying to do a party for 40 people yourself, even a caterer would never do that.”

  • 00:17

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Nikita Harris

    in Food


    Nikita Harris is a catalogue of holiday-entertaining tips, from drinking responsibly to decking the halls for a song. “Make sure your guests have enough to eat. I learned that the hard way. I went out one evening and didn’t have an appetite prior to getting to the party so I didn’t eat. Then I had a couple of drinks and I was really, really ill the next morning. You have to have something in your stomach to absorb the alcohol,” says The VA Housewives host. “Another great tip is, don’t slave away in the kitchen all night. Be organized so once the party starts you can enjoy your guests. What makes or breaks a party is the atmosphere, and it’s up to the hostess to generate good conversation and have good music. Also, holiday decorations don’t have to blow your budget. Poinsettias really brigten up a room, or you can spraypaint branches gold and light a whole bunch of candles. That’s all very inexpensive.”

  • 00:15

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Laura McIntosh

    in Food

    Laura McIntosh wants to help keep meal-planning insanity to a minimum this holiday season. “If you can take the time to organize, it won’t be so hectic. I have a really big family. We’ve done up to 35 people for dinner—with two turkeys. For parties like that, it makes sense to be hyper-organized, like putting little stickers on the serving dishes so when the food’s done, you know what goes where,” the host of the PBS cooking series Bringing It Home tells In the Kitchen’s Jackie Plant. “But keep your menu to the four main ingredients—turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy—then do just one extra dish and get real creative with it. Like a corn chowder soup, or sliced persimmon with candied pecans and dried cranberries salad. Have a signature dish to make the meal memorable.”

  • 00:06

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Michael Feinstein

    in Food


    You gotta admire Michael Feinstein. Yes, for his prodigious jazz-piano talents and melifulous vocal stylings. But also for his willpower during the holiday season.  “To quell my sweet tooth, I’ll have certain jams on vegan bread. As pathetic as it sounds, that’s a big treat for me this time of year,” he tells Laura Theodore, host of the PBS cooking show The Jazzy Vegetarian and its companion BlogTalkRadio series. “With all the temptations that come through the holidays, when I wake up in the morning I think, What am I gonna put in my body?” continues the musical artist, who cites vegan pumpkin pie as his favorite holiday dish. “I visualize how it feels when I eat a certain food. Because we know intuitively what’s good for us and what’s not. Our body tells us what it wants. So I try and eat very simply, and not to get overwhelmed with all the choices.”

  • 00:17

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Carlton Whisonant

    in Food

    Chef Carlton Whisonant doesn’t kid around when it comes to seasoning during the holiday, ah, season. “This time of year, we need to talk about fresh herbs. Because not only will they enhance your Thanksgiving and Christmas dishes, they have strong medicinal properties,” says the host of The Healing Chef. "So they’ll add excellent aroma and flavor to your cooking, while also making you healthier.  A lot of the herbs that we use all the time—cumin, blue violet, bayleaf, alfalfa, garlic, aloe vera, dill, cilantro, coriander—can be found at a regular grocery store.  And the herbs you keep in your kitchen cabinet in a shaker are fine for ocassional use. But to get the full medicinal and culinary value, you’ve got to use fresh herbs.” 

  • 00:08

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Janet Schmidt

    in Food

    When making up for that big X-mas bash, think more Cameron Diaz and less Lady Gaga. That’s the message from Janet Schmidt, aka The Barefoot Domestic Goddess. “Practice your party face beforehand—some afternoon when you have extra time—particularly if you plan to use a different eye shadow or blush than what you normally use,” says the Coffee Break host. “That way, you’re not seeing it for the first time while you’re rushing to get ready for the party, and your husband’s going, ‘Would you hurry up!’ More important is the glitter issue. Glitter’s become very popular in eye makeup. But anyone who’s over a certain age really ought to think twice about the glitter. There are shimmer and luminizing products that have micro-fine glitter. That’s what we need to use if we’re over 25.  And if you do use it, try something from UrbanDecay.”

  • 00:16

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Christine Kish

    in Food


    Whoever said sodium chloride wasn’t the secret to a specatular holiday bird never traded culinary tips with Christine Kish. “The perfect turkey, in my estimation, can only be achieved by taking the time to brine your turkey in a saltwater bath for a good 24 hours prior to cooking it,” says the host of My Mother’s Secrets. “I know that that might seem like an extra step on an already busy holiday. But it’s well worth the effort because the end result is going to be the most juicy, delicious, succulent turkey you’ve ever had in your life, regardless of how you ultimately prepare it.”

  • 00:16

    World Kitchen Holiday Entertaining Radio: Steve Mendoza

    in Food

    You might call Chef Steve Mendoza the Dear Abby of holiday cuisine. In this Thanksgiving special, he answers a string of listener questions on (what else?) turkey cooking. “Erin wants to know, ‘How can I tell if my bird or my roast or whatever it is I’m cooking is done all the way through? Is it time? Is it temperature? Is it a combination of both?’  It can be a combination of both. I would invest in a thermometer, which is the best judge of when food is done,” advises the host of The Steve Mendoza Show. “But you don’t want to use those stupid little pop-out things. They don’t help. They’re set to a specific temperature, which is the UDSA’s, for a done turkey.  But that’s a scientific method ensuring people don’t get sick. It’s 20 degrees higher than it should be. It’s set for 180 degrees, but 165 is good.  Your turkey will be juicy and cooked all the way through at 165 degrees.”

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