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  • 02:56

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Action Day

    in Health

    Join us as we talk about Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and meet families affected by this devastating birth defect on Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Action Day, April 19th!  


    Host - Dawn Williamson, President of CHERUBS


    Guests:


    12:00 - 12:15 pm - Nicki Young (mother of survivor Anderson, calling from Arizona)
    12:15 - 12:30 pm - Sara Ysasi (mother of survivor Aubrey Mae, calling from Texas)
    12:30 - 12:45 pm - James and Christie Korneygay (parents of cherub due, Evelyn from NC)
    12:45 - 1:00 pm - Jessica Jackman (mother of non-survivor, Quinn, calling from BC, Canada)
    1:00 - 1:15 pm - Amber Winthers (mother of non-survivor Amelia, calling from SD)
    1:15 - 1:30 pm - Ericka Atkins (mother of survivor, Bryson, calling from Georgia)
    1:30 - 1:45 pm - Todd Mears (father of non-survivor, Paislee, calling in from Alaska)
    1:45 - 2:00 pm - Paul Woodward (father of survivor London, calling from California)
    2:00 - 2:15 pm - Hope Clyde (mother of survivor Tyler, calling from Utah)
    2:15 - 2:30 pm - Janice Crawford (mother of survivor Angel, calling from NC)
    2:30 - 2:45 pm - Kevin Todd (from Merchant Match)


    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia


    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) occurs when the diaphragm fails to form or to close totally and an opening allows abdominal organs into the chest cavity. This inhibits lung growth.


    CDH occurs in approximately 1 in every 2,500 births (1,600 cases in the U.S. each year). The diaphragm is formed in the first trimester of pregnancy and controls the lungs' ability to inhale and exhale. The cause of CDH is not yet known.


    CHERUBS - The Association of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Research, Awareness, and Support


    Founded in 1995, we are an international charity, helping over 5000 families in 60 countries.


    http://www.cdhsupport.org


     

  • 00:33

    ECMO Success Stories for Babies with Congenital Heart Defects

    in Health

    Sometimes our littlest heart heroes need extraordinary help in order to survive. One of the most extraordinary machines used to save our babies born with congenital heart defects is known as ECMO which stands for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This is a special machine that takes blood from the body, oxygenates it using an artificial lung, and pumps it back into the body using an artificial heart. ECMO is similar to a heart/lung bypass machine used in open heart surgery, but can be used for a longer time.


    Twenty years ago, when my son was just a baby, all of the babies I knew who were put on ECMO passed away. But like with so many types of new technology, things have changes and improved over the year. Now being put on ECMO doesn't have to be a death sentence. Today's show will feature three mothers whose children have been put on ECMO and survived. Hear about their experiences and what they feel other parents need to know on today's show.

  • 00:53

    Pre-Record "ECMO Success Stories for Babies with Congenital Heart Defects"

    in Health

    Sometimes our littlest heart heroes need extraordinary help in order to survive. One of the most extraordinary machines used to save our babies born with congenital heart defects is known as ECMO which stands for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This is a special machine that takes blood from the body, oxygenates it using an artificial lung, and pumps it back into the body using an artificial heart. ECMO is similar to a heart/lung bypass machine used in open heart surgery, but can be used for a longer time.


    Twenty years ago, when my son was just a baby, all of the babies I knew who were put on ECMO passed away. But like with so many types of new technology, things have changes and improved over the year. Now being put on ECMO doesn't have to be a death sentence. Today's show will feature three mothers whose children have been put on ECMO and survived. Hear about their experiences and what they feel other parents need to know on today's show.

  • 00:28

    Natural Medicine for Congenital Heart Defect Survivors

    in Health

    Is it safe to use nontraditional medicine with babies and children who were born with congenital heart defects? Do others in the heart community use nontraditional medicine? Why would a parent consider using complementary and alternative medicine with their children born with heart defects?


    Today's show will feature Carolyn Harrington, the owner of Maty's Healthy Products. Carolyn is the mother of Maty, a daughter who was born with a congenital heart defect and who has had several open-heart surgeries. Discover why Carolyn started Maty's Healthy Products and whether or not using complementary and alternative medicine might be an option for you or a loved one.  


    The information contained in our show is not intended to-constitute comprehensive professional medical services or treatment of any kind. The CONTENT SHOULD NOT BE USED FOR MEDICAL ADVICE, DIAGNOSIS, OR TREATMENT. Our show should be considered as an educational service only.

  • 00:29

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Awareness

    in Health

    Join us for an on-air discussion of ways that you can raise awareness for April 19th, the International Day of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Awareness!


    http://www.cdhawarenessday.org

  • 00:57

    Congenital Heart Defect Advocacy

    in Health

    Congenital Heart Defect (or CHD) Awareness is an extremely important issue. Congenital heart defects (heart defects present at birth) are the #1 Birth Defect. While a commonly reported statistic is 1 in 100 babies are born with a heart defect, that statistic does NOT include the most common CHD – bicuspid aortic valve. In fact, that statistic does NOT include a number of CHDs. That means that more than 1 baby in 100 is born with a CHD. Congenital heart defects also kill more babies than any other birth defect. In the United States there are 40,000 babies born every year with a CHD. There will be one million babies born worldwide with a CHD and 100,000 of them will not live to see their 1st birthday. While these numbers are staggering, there are still many people who are unaware of the fact that babies can be born with CHDs. We must raise awareness to stress the importance of funding research to prevent future generations of children from dying and suffering from this birth defect.

  • 01:01

    Adult Congenital Heart Defect Survivors Finding Love

    in Health

    Two adult women born with complex congenital heart defects share stories about what it was like to grow up and find love in an uncertain world. As a bonus, one of the husbands will be on the show, too! Many parents of children with congenital heart defects wonder if their children will survive infancy and can only hope and pray they will someday be adults. Parents sometimes worry about whether or not anyone will want to spend the rest of their lives with a person who is capable of love but has a funky heart. This show will address some of the fears and concerns adults with heart defects have, but above all, we'll talk about the joy of finding one's true love regardless of being born with a heart defect.

  • 01:01

    Losing a Child to a Congenital Heart Defect

    in Health

    Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000200 EndHTML:0000003747 StartFragment:0000002470 EndFragment:0000003711 SourceURL:file://localhost/Volumes/USB%20DISK/H2Hw-Anna%20Series%201%20Program%20Schedule.doc “Losing a Child to a Congenital Heart Defect.” is an extremely emotional show, and it doesn’t have the happy outcome we’d love for all of our shows to have, but I believe it’s an extremely important topic and one that warrants our attention. To consciously decide not to talk about how many children we lose to CHDs would do a disservice to the thousands of innocent lives lost each year. During this show we honor not only the children we will talk about today with three loving mothers, but we also honor all children and adults who have died because of their congenital heart defects.
     
    While the United States death rate from congenital heart defects dropped 24% from 1999 to 2006 among children and adults, there are far too many people dying from congenital heart defects. Today we will talk with three mothers whose children died too soon. We’ll hear about mothers’ experiences with having a stillborn baby, a baby post-Norwood and an adult child who died long after it was thought she would.
     

  • 01:00

    Siblings in the Congenital Heart Defect Community

    in Health

    Having a chronically ill child in the family has an impact on the whole family, including healthy siblings. According to the World Facts and Statistics on Disabilities and Disability Issues, about 10% of the total world’s population, or roughly 650 million people, live with a disability. Since heart defects are the number one birth defect, millions of families are impacted by congenital heart defects. Families of chronically ill children frequently have healthy children who are often overlooked when the ill child is hospitalized. Children’s responses to having a chronically ill sibling vary depending on age, especially in relation to the age of chronically ill child. In some cases healthy children can develop anxiety, acting out behaviors and depression. In other cases, the healthy children seem to become more mature and compassionate than their peers without chronically ill siblings. This show will examine we can help healthy children cope when their sibling is hospitalized.

  • 01:00

    Sports and Boys with Critical Congenital Heart Defects

    in Health

    Boys born with critical congenital heart defects are frequently not able to participate in sports like their heart-healthy peers. Because of the multiple surgeries needed, the frequent need for pacemakers or the concern about arrhythmias and the other complications that can accompany critical congenital heart defects, survivors of these defects frequently have to avoid contact sports or sports that are intensely aerobic in nature. How does this affect sons' relationships with their fathers? How can they still enjoy sports together despite medical restrictions? This show will feature the father of a young son as well as a father/son pair who have experience with topic.

  • 01:00

    Chiropractic Care for Survivors of Congenital Heart Defects

    in Health

    Survivors of congenital heart defects, or CHDs, have frequently spent many days flat on their backs after having had open-heart surgery or other procedures. How does the abnormal positioning many CHD survivors experience possibly interfere with normal spine relationships with other bones in the body? What is the value of chiropractic care for CHD survivors? What myths surround the use of chiropractic care and what should parents of CHD survivors and survivors themselves know about chiropractic care? Who should receive chiropractic care? Are there certain groups of people who definitely should not receive chiropractic care?