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  • 00:58

    Benefits and Services for Veterans of the US Virgin Islands

    in Culture

    Veterans of the United States armed forces (Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard) may be eligible for a broad range of benefits and services provided by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Some of these benefits may be utilized while on active duty. These benefits are codified in Title 38 of the United States Code. This booklet contains a summary of these benefits effective Jan. 1, 2013. For additional information, visit www.va.gov.

    General Eligibility: Eligibility for most VA benefits is based upon discharge from active military service under other than dishonorable conditions. Active service means full-time service, other than active duty for training, as a member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or as a commissioned officer of the Public Health Service, Environmental Science Services Administration or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or its predecessor, the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

    Dishonorable and bad conduct discharges issued by general courts-martial may bar VA benefits. Veterans in prison must contact VA to determine eligibility. VA benefits will not be provided to any Veteran or dependent wanted for an outstanding felony warrant.

    We invite Virgin Islands veterans to share their stories. Stories connect generations and help our young people learn about the past and maybe choose a military career.

  • 00:59

    Water Island, the Back Door of St. Thomas in the US Virgin Islands

    in Culture

    Water Island is the smallest of the main US Virgin Islands, and that’s what gives it its charm. Rather than shops and restaurants, it’s the thatched cabanas and lazy vibe of idyllic beaches like Honeymoon Beach that are its main draw. Away from the beach, you can tour the underground tunnels and watchtowers of Fort Segarra, built during WWII. Getting around the island is best by bicycle or golfcart.

    Around 160 people are fortunate enough to live on Water Island, but the volcanic island remains undeveloped.Facilities are limited to a few food outlets, dive shops and charters, a beach bar, fishing operator, & ferry dock. The US Virgin Island’s 4th island, Water Island only joined the group relatively recently, in 1996, and so far it’s kept its low-key atmosphere & local character. A 10-minute ferry ride from Charlotte Amalie, it lies southwest of the capital in the harbor, adjacent to Hassel Island.

    Virgin Islands Campground is an eco-sensitive resort with self-contained cottages set on pristine, 500-acre Water Island, in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Known for its natural charm, Water Island is a secluded getaway that should be at the top of your Caribbean vacation list. Spend a quiet day looking out over the ocean from your cottage’s private terrace. 

    A leisure 5-minute walk to idyllic Honeymoon Beach will have you snorkeling & sunbathing. In need of even more adventure? Visit rugged and secluded Limestone Bay, also just a quick trek down from your cabin.

    View "Tour of Water Island" on YouTube featuring Africah Harrigan and Alex Randall.

    Visit www.viator.com/ and www.virginislandscampground.com/

  • 01:00

    The Beaches of the Virgin Islands: St. John

    in Culture

    Most visitors and locals will agree that when it comes to beaches on St. John a 'good to best' scale just would not do. The scale for describing St. John's beaches is 'Great', 'Greater' and 'It's a secret so I am not telling anyone'. All beaches on St. John are open to the public. Beachfront property however, in many cases is private and a few popular beaches have hotels nearby. Respect private property when accessing beaches. It is illegal to collect shells from beaches in the Virgin Islands; shells are confiscated at airport customs. There are no clothing-optional beaches in the Virgin Islands.

    General Beach Information:

    Don’t feed marine life or sea birds. Food not naturally in their diet, like various human foods, can create health problems for these animals.

    All beaches in the U.S. Virgin Islands are open to the public. Beyond a beach's tree line however is typically private property.

    Resort beaches are open to the public; only some, however, rent chairs and water sports gear to non-guests.

    Swimming pools and similar resort amenities are typically reserved for registered-guests only.

    Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sun block, a hat and sunglasses.

    Sun, rum, and fun can spell dehydration; so drink plenty of water.

    There are no clothing optional beaches; public nudity is illegal.

    Removing shells and sand from beaches is illegal.

    Courtesy of www.VINow.com/StJohn/Beaches_stj/

  • The Beaches of the Virgin Islands: St. Croix

    in Culture

    St. Croix's palm lined and sun kissed beaches call visitors to spend a couple hours and sometimes the entire day enjoying the natural beauty. The largest of the four islands in the USVI, St. Croix is sometimes referred to as the ‘big island’. The 84 square mile island is home to 53,000+ residents. The 2 main towns are Christiansted and Frederiksted. Resorts and condos are mostly on the north shore and vacation villas can be found in various areas.Take a look at the 23 beaches included in this guide and select your favorites - you are certain to find a few!

    Three National Parks: Salt River which protects a diverse ecosystem in addition to pre-historic ruins; Buck Island with stunning marine gardens; and five historic structures in Christiansted that give visitors a look into Danish colonial way of life. Additional parks and preserves include: Sandy Point notable for its beauty and for its protected sea turtles, and Jack and Isaac Bays. You can fly directly to St. Croix, it has an airport. . ~ Courtesy of VINow.com


    Straight from the shore, no boats or air tanks required! The guide contains over 300 full color photographs that show you the underwater environments that you will experience at 20 of the best snorkeling beaches in the United States Virgin Islands. Order today at www.vinow.com/stx/stx-b/sand-castle-beach/

  • The Beaches of the Virgin Islands: St. Thomas

    in Culture

    "St. Thomas has over 40 major beaches along its sun-drenched coasts. There are strands with crystal blue water and swaying coconut trees where a beach bum can enjoy a lazy-lazy day. For the restless beach goers there are sandy coves with activities like windsurfing and kayaks. Some shores are rugged and rocky offering beauty, solitude and the opportunity to daydream about castaway fantasies. And there are widely popular bays with amenities like restaurants and chair rentals.In this St. Thomas Beach Guide you will find 20 of the island’s most popular beaches, and a few off-the-beaten-track spots; complete with description, map, photos and reviews." 

    General Beach Information

    Resort beaches are open to the public; only some however rent chairs and water sports gear to non-guests. Swimming pools and similar resort amenities are typically reserved for registered-guests only.
    All beaches in the U.S. Virgin Islands are open to the public. Beyond a beach's tree line however is typically private property.
    Don’t feed marine life or sea birds. Food not naturally in their diet, like various human foods, can create health problems for these animals.
    Protect yourself from the sun. Wear sun block, a hat and sunglasses.
    Sun, rum and fun can spell dehydration; drink plenty of water.
    There are no clothing optional beaches; public nudity is illegal.
    Removing shells and sand from beaches is illegal.

    Courtesy of www.vinow.com/stthomas/beaches_stt/

  • 00:30

    LIVE! with Cathi...Islands where traditions loom large.

    in Fitness

    In the Caribbean, traditions loom large in three small islands.  Folk Cultures thrive far away from the tourist hordes. Dominica-Tobago-Anguilla.  The lesser known islands in the Caribbean whose virtues are unsung.

    DOMINICA-where carnival is a holiday and is what it was meant to be, a celebration.  Tuesday is carnival day, a sea of traditional costumes made from strips of frayed paper.  In DOMINICA the island prides itself on staying true to it's 18th century roots.

    TOBAGO-mermen come calling.  There are no mermaids in TOBAGO folk lore.

    ANGUILLA- the monarchy of goats.



    West African folk lore...etc.

    Mermen, where did they come from...etc.

    For centuries, GOATS have...etc.

    Carnival-Mermen and Goats...etc.

  • 00:30

    Gee Tenks: Frum de Gullah/Geechee Sea Islands ta de Seminoles

    in Culture

    Tune in to the annual "Gee Tenks" edition of "Gullah/Geechee Riddim Radio with Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) who is also the hostess of the broadcast on behalf of the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition (www.gullahgeechee.net).   She will continue the celebration of Native American Heritage Month and discuss the tradition of giving thanks in the Gullah/Geechee Nation.

    Disya da we sho-Gullah/Geechee Riddim Radio!


  • 00:27

    Croatia Country of 1000 Islands Wanda Krivicich Dengel Oct 28 2015 at 1:00 pm

    in Education

    CROATIA: A Country of 1,000 Islands with host Wanda Krivicich Dengel discussing The Republic of Croatia -Part I

    1:00 pm, Wednesday, October 28, 2015 –Croatia: A Country of 1,000 Islands – Part 1 with host Wanda Krivicich Dengel, M.A. Education, gives a historical and cultural introduction to the Republic of Croatia. Croatia is rich in culture and history and ranked the 18th most popular tourist destination in the world.  It is a sovereign state at the crossroads of Central Europe, Southeast Europe, and the Mediterranean. Its capital city is Zagreb, which forms one of the country's primary subdivisions, along with its twenty counties.  Croatia covers 21,851 square miles and has diverse, mostly continental and Mediterranean climates.

    Wanda Krivicich Dengel, M.A. in Education

    Blog Address:   http://mrsdengel2.blogspot.com

  • 02:03

    Economic Comparison of Alternatives to building a port on Goat Islands

    in Environment

    SUNDAY Nov. 2, 2014  LIVE On Line Radio

    NEWS In Review.- News Stories From Jamaica Over The Past Week.
    In Focus: In Depth Discussion of News Stories
    Main Topic: Special Guest- Ingrid Parchment from C-CAM: Economic Comparison of Alternatives to building a port on Goat Islands: Study
    MUSIC- Local And International Artists (Shae Mill, Marcia Griffiths, Elijah, Planet Groove, and more)

    Join Your Hosts:  Karen Ayee, Steven Smith, Annamarie Hassock & Aven Peralto

    5p (PST) 6p (MT/Jam) 7p (CST) 8p (EST)

    Contact Us Live In The Studio To Take Part In The Show

    914-338-1983 or use Skype

    Join Our Face Book Page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/no.onportgoatisland/

    Twitter: #savegoatislandsjam

    Web Site: http://www.noportongoatisland.com/


    A production of The Peralto JADE Foundation- Jamaica Action, Dialogue, & Education 

    (a US based registered non-profit/NGO)

  • 01:00

    Emancipation of Slaves in the British Virgin Islands, Rebroadcasting

    in Culture

    The British Virgin Islands, part of a volcanic archipelago in the Caribbean, is a British overseas territory comprising 4 main islands and many smaller ones. Tortola is home to the low-key capital, Road Town, and rainforested Sage Mountain National Park. On Virgin Gorda is The Baths, a labyrinth of beachside boulders.

    The abolition of slavery occurred on 1 August 1834, and to this day it is celebrated by a three day public holiday on the first Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday in August in the British Virgin Islands. The original emancipation proclamation hangs in the High Court. However, the abolition of slavery was not the single event that it is sometimes supposed to have been. Emancipation freed a total of 5,792 slaves in the Territory, but at the time of abolition, there were already a considerable number of free blacks in the Territory, possibly as many as 2,000.

    In January 1808, HMS Cerberus seized the American schooner, the Nancy with a cargo of enslaved Senegalese Africans in the Territory's waters; between August 1814 and February 1815 a further four ships' slave cargoes were seized from the Venus, the Manuella, the Atrevido and the Candelaria and a further 1,318 liberated slaves were deposited on Tortola's shores (of whom just over 1,000 survived).

    In 1819, a Portuguese slave ship, the Donna Paula, was wrecked upon the reef at Anegada. The ship's crew and 235 slaves were saved from the wreckage. Further Spanish ships, enroute to Puerto Rico were reported wrecked on the reef at Anegada in 1817 and 1824, and their cargos settled on Tortola.

    Although many of these former slaves died due to the appalling conditions that they were kept in during the transatlantic crossing, a large number survived, and had children. - Courtesy of wikipedia.org


  • 00:49

    Gullah Native of the Sea Islands in South Carolina, Anita Singleton-Prather

    in Education

    Aunt Pearlie Sue is the creation of Anita Singleton-Prather, a native of the Sea Islands in Beaufort County, South Carolina. Based on her grandmother, Aunt Pearlie-Sue's character has entertained audiences with Gullah-flavored folktales for over 10 years.

    In addition to being a storyteller, Prather is an educator, singer, actress and historian. She is the founder and a member of the musical performance group the Gullah Kinfolk. As a storyteller and singer, Prather has performed at many festivals, including the Spoleto USA international arts festival in Charleston. She has appeared in the Hollywood film Forrest Gump and on the ABC television program Good Morning America. In addition to her participation in educational documentaries, Prather's one-woman show, Tales from the Land of Gullah, has been broadcast on PBS.

    Prather is also the curriculum coordinator for the Education of Gullah Culture Through the Arts in the Beaufort County School District. She holds a bachelor's degree in psychology from Howard University and a master's degree in education from the University of South Carolina.

    To schedule Anita Singleton-Prather for an event, contact Total Eclipse Entertainment by phone 843-225-6323 (office), 843-425-7720 (mobile) or by bookings@totaleclipseentertainment.com.