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    in Health

    The metastatic breast cancer experience is often overlooked, misunderstood or silenced by those who fear it due to lack of knowledge and education. Joining us is MJ DeCoteau, (Executive Director and Founder, Rethink Breast Cancer) to discuss the metastatic breast cancer awareness day and what Rethink Breast Cancer is doing to support the metastatic community. Survivor Spotlight on breast cancer survivor Christa Wittmier.

  • 01:16


    in Health

    Young Adult Suvivor, Breast Cancer
    Communications Manager
    Breast Cancer Action
    Program Manager
    Breast Cancer Action
    Membership Coordinator
    Breast Cancer Action

  • 00:31

    Breast Cancer Awareness Month

    in Health

    Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. Except for skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women. Breast cancer screening means checking a woman’s breasts for cancer before she has any symptoms.. Mammograms are the best way to find breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat and before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms. Most women who are 50 to 74 years old should have a screening mammogram every two years. If you are 40 to 49years old, or think you may have a higher risk of breast cancer, ask your doctor when to have a screening mammogram. Some things may increase your risk. If you have risk factors, you may be more likely to get breast cancer.
    Reproductive risk factors
    • Being younger when you had your first menstrual period.
    • Never giving birth, or being older at the birth of your first child.
    • Starting menopause at a later age.• Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time.
    Other risk factors
    • Getting older.
    • A personal history of breast cancer, dense breasts, or some other
    breast problems.
    • A family history of breast cancer (parent, sibling, or child).
    • Changes in your breast cancer-related genes (BRCA1 or BRCA2).
    • Getting radiation therapy to the breast or chest.
    • Being overweight, especially after menopause.

    Can’t afford a mammogram?
    If you have a low income or do not haveinsurance and are between the ages of
    40 and 64, you may qualify for a free or
    low-cost mammogram through CDC’s
    National Breast and Cervical Cancer
    Early Detection Program. To learn more,
    call (800) CDC-INFO.     Ref:  cdc.gov

  • 01:04


    in Health

    Inflammatory breast cancer accounts for 1 to 5 percent of all breast cancers diagnosed in the United States and tends to be diagnosed at younger ages. Tonight we welcome Terry Arnold (Founder, IBC Network Foundation) and Dr. Wendy Woodward to discuss this often misdiagnosed disease. Survivor Spotlight on Tolley St. Clair.

  • 01:01

    Breast Cancer: Prevention First

    in Environment

    Janet Nudelman, Director of Campaign for Safe Cosmetics and Director of Program and Policy, Breast Cancer Fund

    This organization works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating our exposure to toxic chemicals and radiation linked to the disease. They are bold and intentional in their efforts to translate a growing body of SCIENTIC EVIDENCE linking breast cancer and environmental exposure into public education and advocacy campaigns that protect our health and reduce breast cancer risk. They are helping to transform how our society thinks about and uses chemicals and radiation with the goal of preventing breast cancer and sustaining health and life. Last but certainly not least, they find practical solutions so that our children, grandchildren and planet can thrive. I don’t want to miss hearing a word of what Janet Nudelman has to say. This show made possible through the generous support of Chapman Automotive Group.

  • 00:29

    Breast Cancer: Faith and Spiritual Encouragement

    in Family

    Its October - Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  Let's talk about Faith and Spiritual Encouragement with Dr. Sharon Johnson.  

    Here are a number of Bible verses of promise and encouragement that one survivor copied into her own notebook before, during and after treatment for my own cancer. When she was struggling and needed help, these were what she held onto.  Taken from 


    General Web Resources for Women Fighting Breast Cancer

    American Cancer Society (ACS)

    A great resource providing information and patient support through multiple programs, including Cancer Survivors Network, Road to Recovery (rides to treatment), TLC (hair loss and mastectomy products), Reach to Recovery (one on one breast cancer support), and Look Good….Feel Better (help with appearance related side-effects of treatment), see below.



    Connect with Dr. Sharon Johnson http://www.comtivate.com



  • 10 Strategies to Prevent and Treat Breast Cancer Naturally

    in Health

    It's National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    Breast cancer risk has significantly increased due to factors such as poor diet, toxins, chronic stress, and sleep deprivation. Imbalances in seven key systems in your body contribute to breast cancer, along with every other disease.

    Implement These Key Strategies to Treat or Prevent Breast Cancer.


    About Your Host:

    Jessie Blair-Myrie, CHHC, AADP


  • 00:57

    Breast Cancer Awareness - Patrice Keeling WineMiller

    in Motivation

    Patrice says "In November 2009, after an 8 and a half years with the disease, my mother gained her wings and joined her oldest sister and her mom (both cancer victims) in heaven.  With one maternal aunt surviving cancer, I saw no choice but to find out all I could of this horrible disease and how to keep it from affecting me and my daughters.

    As my mother’s last gift to me at her final doctors visit, she donated to me her DNA, so that any testing needed could be done.  WHAT A WONDERFUL GIFT!   In January 2010, I started my first doctor visits.  I spoke with my mom’s Oncologist regarding how in depth the cancer was and what my chances were at the time of possibly getting cancer.  I spoke to specialist about testing for certain genes that my family might have .  I finally decided something more HAD to be done.  The doctor stated with my chances of getting cancer, that it would be best for me to have testing every six months or I could go ahead and have a double mastectomy and reconstruction.  That weighed heavily on me at first but with thoughts going back to all my mom and aunts had gone through, it became an easy decision….I was having surgery!  I spoke to mom’s Oncologist who recommended the perfect person to perform my Mastectomy and a great friend who had already been through the procedure introduced me to my plastic surgeon.  Together, we had the perfect team!   This was something I had to do not just for me but for my future – my kids.  I wanted to be around for them."  

  • 01:00

    Episode 34: Beautiful After Breast Cancer

    in Medicine

    How do you go from one day not having breast cancer, the next day you’re diagnosed with it, and then you feel beautiful? Hold on now! There’s a huge gap there! How does anyone go from diagnosis to beautiful? And does one EVER get there? 

    Yes. It is possible. I’m living proof. But you must have a strong foundation. And in today’s show, you’ll meet a huge portion of the strong foundation, two prominent surgeons who will share much more than their medical knowledge with you, although they do a good deal of that, too. Dr. Alison Laidley and Dr. John Antonetti of Medical City Hospital located in Dallas, Texas share the softer side of the scalpel…they show you their hearts as they speak very candidly about a delicate topic. 

    Let’s kick off October right! Join us as we embrace our beauty! 

  • 01:08

    Thriving in Seasons of Change…Surviving Breast Cancer

    in Self Help

    Margaret Totten, breast cancer survivor, like many of us, has faced many fears and overcome many challenges in life.

    Margaret is a Registered Professional Counselor, a Certified Life Coach (CPCC) and s Certified Intuitive Coach who cares deeply about helping clients find peace and balance in times of personal and professional change. 

    Margaret’s own experiences with life transitions and early stage breast cancer have shown her that healing and moving forward after life’s challenges takes both insight and focused action.  She is now dedicated to helping others in similar situations become resilient, cope with uncertainty, and find safety within.    

    Margaret says “Nothing, however, prepared me for the feeling of being adrift and confused AFTER I had conquered surgery, chemotherapy and radiation for early stage breast cancer several years ago. It really became clear to me that this was something many, many self-sufficient, strong, capable women also face.”

    “People are just starting to talk about what I like to call “Post-survival Pain.”

    “This “after burn”, can be: -When we finally take our guard down. -When the constant need for daily battle ends. -When we try to return to work full-time. -When we try to live life as it was and return to what was “normal” 

    Letting Go... Includes giving up old ways of seeing ourselves.

    Accepting Change…  Just as change is a process, so is moving toward acceptance of it.

    Margaret coaches and counsels clients from her private practice, Second Sight Coaching & Counselling.  visit www.secondsightcoaching.com.

  • 01:03

    Breast cancer awareness

    in Family



    Let's  talk about it !


    Join us for a heartfelt discussion on breast cancer awareness.


    Log on, listen in, and call us. Tuesday, August 25th 7:00-8:00 pm

    Call in 646-668-2729

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