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  • 01:59

    Salasaca Aymara (Quechua) National President Nicolas Chango

    in Religion

    Show was delayed due to unknown issues on Blogtalk's end.


    Prerecorded...


    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador

    By Steve Grove


    June 16, 2004


    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.


    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.


    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.


    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.


     

  • 02:00

    Nicolas Chango, Salasaca Aymara- Ecuadorian Indigenous People's Defense Office

    in Religion

    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nations
    Nicholas Chango—Indigenous Leader from Ecuador (LinkedIn)(Website)(Facebook)


    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.


    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.


    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.


    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.


    After his high school graduation, Chango envisioned a future of political activism for the Salasacan people in mainstream Ecuadorian society. But Chango’s life changed drastically in 1989.


     


     


     

  • 02:06

    Prophecykeepers - Salasaca Aymara Nicolas Chango of Equador

    in Spirituality

    Prerecorded...
    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador By Steve Grove
    June 16, 2004
    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.
    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.
    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.
    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.

  • 02:50

    Prophecykeepers Radio - Salasaca Aymara Elder Nicolas Chango

    in Spirituality

    Prerecorded...
    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador

    By Steve Grove
    June 16, 2004
    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.
    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.
    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.
    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.

  • 02:06

    Prophecykeepers Radio - Salasaca Aymara Elder Nicolas Chango

    in Spirituality

    Past Salasaca National President Nicolas "Miguel" Chango at the United Nation--Indigenous Leader from Ecuador

    By Steve Grove
    June 16, 2004
    In one way or another, Nicholas Chango has been preparing for leadership since the day he was born. The elders of his tribe in Ecuador, the Salasaca, predicted that Chango would be a great leader, and commemorated his birth with many ceremonies. From an early age, Chango says, they put him through an intense training program that sometimes lasted 15 hours a day.
    Brought to a cornfield in the early hours of the morning, Chango was taught to listen to nature and pray to the sun.
    "[The elders] helped me to understand that all the land is interconnected, " Chango remembers. Later, these elders (called yachaj) wanted Chango to learn how to represent the Salasaca in Ecuadorian society. So they sent him to high school outside of the village.
    There, Chango came into contact with non-indigenous Ecuadorians and a society that has a long history of oppression of indigenous peoples. Spanish conquistadors came to Equador in 1534, taking control of the land and weakening the indigenous population with disease. Many Salasacan women were reportedly used as forced laborers. In the 21st century, conflicts between the groups have continued, as indigenous groups wrestle with the mestizo population for a voice in the country’s tenuous democracy.

  • 01:37

    JERRY WILLS - interview The Stargate of Aramu Maru Expeditio

    in Paranormal

    EARTH WISDOM RADIO Guest: Jerry Wills
    Far from civilization, and high within the Andes, an outcropping of ancient petrified sandstone was shaped by the hands of a forgotten civilization.
    The technology they possessed exceeds the current understand of quantum principles: The Stargate of Aramu Muru. The outcropping was made ornate by including the features of a woman lying on her back as she gazes silently towards the sky.
    Beneath her, a shallow entryway, an odd keyhole, was placed whose secrets have been known to the Aymara shaman for thousands of years. Now, at the end of an era in 2013, those secrets have been given.
     
    The mysterious portal has opened once again to those gifted enough, brave enough, to pass through.
    But who or what, waits on the other side?
     
    We will explore these questions and more with our guest:  Jerry Willis
    Topics:
    - The Stargate of Aramu Muru
    -The History of the area, what is known
    -Tau Ceti Star System
    - Jerry Wills discusses his own extraterrestrial experience and how it was to grow up very different than other humans, including being 6’6 in eighth grade, his purpose, goal and vision after being placed on planet Earth.
    -the Council of Worlds for the betterment of Earth
    -How he was adopted by a human family, how he dealt with his unusual abilities growing up
    -How he was visited regularly by an extraterrestrial delegation that briefed him on his extraterrestrial --identity and his mission
    -How during these visits he was told to watch for specific signs

  • 00:31

    Walking in the Kingdom in Bolivia part 1

    in Spirituality

    As a missionary for almost three years in Bolivia I watched the hand of God move in miracles and salvations.  Speaking from Mark 2, this episode explores God's commandment "to go" and the stories of how God moved in Bolivia in my behalf and on behalf of the Bolivian people in the cities and in the remote villages of the Aymara and Quechua people.  Tune in and listen to stories from the witches markets, the streets of La Paz, the Bolivian mountains and the Amazon jungles.

  • 00:31

    Andano en el reino de Dios en Bolivia

    in Spirituality

       Mi esposa, Rhonda, mi hijo, Samuel y yo éramos misioneros por casi tres años en Bolivia.  Volvemos a Estados Unidos en Marzo.   Miramos la mano de Dios mueve en milagros y salvaciones durante este tiempo.    Hablando de Marcos 2:1-13, esta programa explora el mandamiento de Dios “ir” y las cuentas acerca de Dios moviendo cuando una persona repuesta la llamando de Dios.  Dios movía en la gente de Bolivia en las ciudades,  en los pueblos de Aymara y Quechua, en las calles, en el mercado de las brujas, en la selva, y en las montañas por la gente.    Escucha a esta programa, parte 1, como hablo acerca de Bolivia, mis amigos, y los milagros de Dios.