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  • 02:02

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:05

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:33

    Rock Hudson's Physician, Dr. Michael Gottlieb, Honored by Desert AIDS Project

    in Current Events

    The 2015 Science and Medicine Award was presented to Dr. Michael Gottlieb, a physician and immunologist best known for his identification of AIDS as a new disease with the first diagnoses in June 1981. Gottlieb was famously Rock Hudson’s doctor, following the actor’s AIDS diagnosis until his death in 1985, as well as physician to the namesake of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, which shares with Desert AIDS Project the distinction of being named a “Top 20 HIV/AIDS Charity” for both 2013 and 2014.


    Nicholas Snow (with guest co-host Kristin Johnson) is thrilled to present a seven-part comprehensive series documenting the 2015 Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards held February 9th at the Palm Springs Convention Center, raising $1.3 million for direct client services at Desert AIDS Project. Special thanks to the gala producer Momentous Events for helping us secure the audio.

  • 02:11

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:08

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:32

    Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas

    in Women

    On March 10th at 2pm Eastern, the NLN will be hosting a Blog Talk Radio titled Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas: Strategies that Work. This 30 minute discussion will feature Latina activists who will talk about the intersections of violence against women and girls and HIV/AIDS from a culturally specific perspective.  

  • 00:34

    13-Year-Old Singer Shines at Humanitarian Awards Benefiting Desert AIDS Project

    in Current Events

    "Graham Berger Sacks, a young man of 13 years, played keyboard and sang an original song he had written for the event, "Something You Can Do." His tenderness and sweet voice added a heartwarming touch to the celebration, resulting in a standing ovation. Sacks, by the way, is the grandson of philanthropists Barbara and Jerry Keller," reported Alexis Hunter for The Desert Sun.  Also, in this episode, the Kellers on the red carpet, plus powerful speeches by co-chairs Jim Casey and Barbara Keller.


    Nicholas Snow (with guest co-host Kristin Johnson) is thrilled to present a seven-part comprehensive series documenting the 2015 Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards held February 9th at the Palm Springs Convention Center, raising $1.3 million for direct client services at Desert AIDS Project. Special thanks to the gala producer Momentous Events for helping us secure the audio.

  • 01:00

    Our Viral Lives: Young Activists Discuss HIV/AIDS

    in LGBT

    Unfortunately, some people believe that HIV/AIDS is over. Many of us know better. While the leaders of the early movement are very visibile to some -- names like Peter Staley and Mark Harrington come to mind -- some are unsure about who will be leading the movement of tomorrow. More importantly, what will the HIV/AIDS epidemic look like in the future? Today, we will speak with four young activists who recently presented at New York City's LGBT Center about their work as young HIV/AIDS activists. We will talk with Kyle Bella, the founder of Our Viral Lives, a digital narrative project, Martez Smith, an HIV+ black public health student, Kia Labeija an artist and photographer and a part of New York City's famed House of Labeija and Charlie Ferrusi, an MPH student who hopes to enter the world of government work and make advocacy for underrepresented populations his focus. 


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton. 

  • 00:58

    Choosing to marry and deciding to stay married…. What’s the benefit?

    in Family

    Join us Sunday April 12, 2015 5:30 CST as we raise the questions:


    Choosing to marry and deciding to stay married…. What’s the benefit? 


    How should we support and encourage healthy relationships and marriages? 


    Today's host is not a stranger to the MTAS family. Les Rodgers is committed to public safety, the health of families, businesses and communities. Through ITC consulting and training he shares his passion, ideas and expertise in areas of effective communication and time management. 


    To add your voice and have your views heard please call 718-508-9555 Press #1 to speak your mind or always feel free to simply listen to the mind of others. 


     

  • 00:33

    Do Women See Their Men As A Benefit Or A Threat To Their Existence?

    in Lifestyle

    Is the typical woman worried or bombarded with the  concern that her life might be in danger at the hands of her husband or  male significant other?


    ....Very possibly..


    What are the variables or factors  which have fueled such a conclusion or belief?


    Base on where we are socially, is this a justified, or real, or valid concern that women should always keep in the forefront of their minds?


    Lastly: Are women exonerated from being co-creators of  such seeming reality?


     


    Join Nalagy & Jahwie this week as we discuss........


     


    Be There!


     

  • 01:00

    Tania Luna - the benefit of surprise for both you and your dog

    in Pets

     


     


    The value of surprise in your life and for your dog!  Visit www.surpriseindustries.com for more information.  Below is a just a little bit of content from the site.  





    Surprise intensifies our emotions by about 400% (making special occasions even specialer)
    Our happiest memories contain an element of surprise
    Surprise deepens and brightens our relationships
    We feel most comfortable when things are certain, but we feel most alive when they’re not
    Get your hands on our book (due out in 2015): http://smile.amazon.com/dp/0399169822
    Watch Tania’s TED talk on how small surprises taught her to be grateful: http://go.ted.com/u77




    LIsten to today's conversation with Julie Forbes and Tania Luna about how surprise can benefit you and your dog.


    Find all episodes of The Dog Show with Julie Forbes archived on www.dogradioshow.com.