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  • 02:02

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:05

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 02:11

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:32

    Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas

    in Women

    On March 10th at 2pm Eastern, the NLN will be hosting a Blog Talk Radio titled Responding to HIV/AIDS in the Context of Violence Against Latinas: Strategies that Work. This 30 minute discussion will feature Latina activists who will talk about the intersections of violence against women and girls and HIV/AIDS from a culturally specific perspective.  

  • 02:08

    Positively Dee for discussion about HIV/AIDS

    in Social Networking

    Join us for HIV/AIDS discussion bringing awarness to the community.


    Historically, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has affected more men than women. However, if new HIV infections continue at their current rate worldwide, women with HIV may soon outnumber men with HIV.


    HIV infection impacts a growing number of women in Illinois each year. Nearly 7,000 women in Illinois are currently known to be living with HIV and/or AIDS. Many hundreds of other women are probably living with HIV even though they are unaware of their own infection.


    HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts African-American women in Illinois and the United States. Nationally, HIV infection is the leading cause of death for African-American women between the ages of 25 and 34. In Illinois, the number of HIV cases among African-American women continues to climb. Roughly 68 percent of Illinois women living with HIV are African American, while African Americans only make up 15 percent of the Illinois population. Caucasian women account for 16 percent of Illinois women living with HIV, while the Caucasian population represents more than 73 percent of Illinois residents. Latina women represent roughly 11 percent of the HIV/AIDS cases in women, while 13 percent of the Illinois population is Latino. Roughly 4 percent of women with HIV are from Native American, Asian, Pacific Islander and other communities.


    Women in their 30s are the most likely to be living with HIV/AIDS, and almost all Illinois women living with HIV are between the ages of 20 and 50.

  • 00:33

    Rock Hudson's Physician, Dr. Michael Gottlieb, Honored by Desert AIDS Project

    in Current Events

    The 2015 Science and Medicine Award was presented to Dr. Michael Gottlieb, a physician and immunologist best known for his identification of AIDS as a new disease with the first diagnoses in June 1981. Gottlieb was famously Rock Hudson’s doctor, following the actor’s AIDS diagnosis until his death in 1985, as well as physician to the namesake of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, which shares with Desert AIDS Project the distinction of being named a “Top 20 HIV/AIDS Charity” for both 2013 and 2014.


    Nicholas Snow (with guest co-host Kristin Johnson) is thrilled to present a seven-part comprehensive series documenting the 2015 Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards held February 9th at the Palm Springs Convention Center, raising $1.3 million for direct client services at Desert AIDS Project. Special thanks to the gala producer Momentous Events for helping us secure the audio.

  • 01:00

    Our Viral Lives: Young Activists Discuss HIV/AIDS

    in LGBT

    Unfortunately, some people believe that HIV/AIDS is over. Many of us know better. While the leaders of the early movement are very visibile to some -- names like Peter Staley and Mark Harrington come to mind -- some are unsure about who will be leading the movement of tomorrow. More importantly, what will the HIV/AIDS epidemic look like in the future? Today, we will speak with four young activists who recently presented at New York City's LGBT Center about their work as young HIV/AIDS activists. We will talk with Kyle Bella, the founder of Our Viral Lives, a digital narrative project, Martez Smith, an HIV+ black public health student, Kia Labeija an artist and photographer and a part of New York City's famed House of Labeija and Charlie Ferrusi, an MPH student who hopes to enter the world of government work and make advocacy for underrepresented populations his focus. 


    You can follow Mathew Rodriguez on Twitter at @mathewrodriguez. 


    You can follow Aaron Laxton on Twitter at @aaronlaxton. 

  • 00:01

    RED ALERT AIDS/HIV AWARENESS

    in Entertainment

    Hiv and Aids is at and all time high. Call and join the panel with any questions, comments And concerns. Chat with the ladies from my 1st DY'CUMENTARY ON AIDS AWARENESS!

  • 01:42

    Gala's Riveting Speeches Expose the Heart & Soul of Desert AIDS Project

    in Current Events

    This final episode of the Nicholas Snow Live coverage of the 2015 Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards Gala brings together powerful and poignant speeches by D.A.P. CEO David Brinkman, Board Co-Chairs Barbara Keller and Jim Casey, Allan Joy, and Paul Koval, with performance by Keller's 13-year-old Graham Berger Sacks, Shoshana Bean and the cast of Live It Up! Productions.


    Desert AIDS Project (D.A.P.) serves people living with HIV and AIDS by providing comprehensive support, including medical care, case management, and social services, like food, housing, and counseling. D.A.P. also offers free and confidential HIV testing at a number of locations throughout the communities it serves. 


    Nicholas Snow (with guest co-host Kristin Johnson) is thrilled to present a seven-part comprehensive series documenting the 2015 Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards held February 9th at the Palm Springs Convention Center, raising $1.3 million for direct client services at Desert AIDS Project. Special thanks to the gala producer Momentous Events for helping us secure the audio.

  • 00:30

    Maria Davis-Premier Promoter- Aids Activist

    in Women

    Maria began a professional modeling career at the uncommon age of twenty-one in the early eighties—when black faces were rarely seen in magazines. But it was Maria’s true love of Black music that led her to her professional calling. Having a keen eye for talent and with the help of mentors, she became known as one of New York’s premiere promoters. Maria created the legendary M.A.D. Wednesday’s music showcases which continues to provide venues for signed and unsigned R&B and hip-hop artists and comedians who had no other performance options In 1995 Maria’s life took a turn when she contracted the HIV virus unknowingly from her soon-to-be-husband. Along with keeping her M.A.D. Wednesday showcases going strong, Maria dedicates her life as an HIV/AID’s activist.  She regularly speaks to educators, health care providers, ministers and social workers regarding HIV/AIDS awareness and sensitivity including being the key note speaker for the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS. She has appeared on numerous radio and television shows including WBLS, MTV and BET and has been honored by many including; New York Urban League, National Black Commission and Trailblazer Award to name a few. Maria is a mother of two and continues paying it forward.

  • 01:56

    WORLD AIDS DAY-Be Part of the SOLUTION

    in Health

    Coming back to CWT4R are HIV/AIDS Activist Felix and Paula Sirls. HIV/Aids is still living strong in our community taking our parents, children, friends and our intimacy. For so many years there have been warriors in our community that have been educating, testing the young and old, giving people back their dignity and pride through counseling and motivation. Join us as we talk about the last 30 plus years and how the many success stories have kept our guest motivated and activist in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Also what they are doing now in this fight and what you can do to join and why you need to join this movement of educating about HIV/AIDS. They will also discuss the current movement and what has changed and what is going on in Michigan as it relates to HIV/AIDS .

    Listen in as Felix and Paula Sirls return to help us celebrate World Aids Day. This is a team that they both work hard to educate, counsel and pray together with those suffering with HIV/AID and their families. Working at the Institute for Public Health, Felix for over 30 years has help members of the community diagnosed with HIV/AIDS educate them self on the illness. He now is an HIV/AIDS Counselor and tester. While Paula his wife and mother of his children work as a Program Manager for Gospel Against AIDS (GAA) Sometimes helping the body and the mind is just not enough there has to be deeper healing and Paula will talk to us more about that.

    Join us if you would like to share with us your story, it may help a stranger or a family. Give the gift of understanding and knowledge to someone that may need it more than you know.
    We all must educate ourselves and get involved in this fight against HIV/AIDS there is strength in numbers and the numbers are growing.

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