Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

  • 02:26

    CRAZY NATION RADIO . THE ACT OF 1871

    in Politics

    1871, February 21: Congress Passes an Act to Provide a Government for the District of Columbia, also known as the Act of 1871.
    With no constitutional authority to do so, Congress creates a separate form of government for the District of Columbia, a ten mile square parcel of land (see, Acts of the Forty-first Congress,” Section 34, Session III, chapters 61 and 62).
    The act – passed when the country was weakened and financially depleted in the aftermath of the Civil War — was a strategic move by foreign interests (international bankers) who were intent upon gaining a stranglehold on the coffers and neck of America. Congress cut a deal with the international bankers (specifically Rothschilds of London) to incur a DEBT to said bankers. Because the bankers were not about to lend money to a floundering nation without serious stipulations, they devised a way to get their foot in the door of the United States.



    The Act of 1871 formed a corporation called THE UNITED STATES. The corporation, OWNED by foreign interests, moved in and shoved the original Constitution into a dustbin. With the Act of 1871, the organic Constitution was defaced – in effect vandalized and sabotage – when the title was capitalized and the word FOR was changed to OF in the title.


     

  • 01:00
  • 00:49

    Episode 1871 - The Al Cuppett Hour 10-7-2014

    in Spirituality

    Episode 1871 - The Al Cuppett Hour 10-7-2014
    Recorded LIVE 10-7-2014 on Omega Man Radio


    The Al Cuppett Hour
    Minister Al Cuppett
    Al Cuppett's Website is: via www.alcuppett.com
    Mailing Address is: Al Cuppett PO Box 111 Wolftown, VA 22748


    Shannon Ray Davis is The Omega Man
    The Official Website of Omega Man Radio is: omegamanradio.com
    Facebook: omegamanradio
    Email omegamanradio@yahoo.com


    Casting out devils, Exorcism, Exorcist, Deliverance from demons in Jesus Christ Name is what omega man radio is all about.


    Tune in live Mon-Fri Nightly at 7pm Eastern at: mixlr.com/omegamanradio


    Dial 1-917-889-2745 if you need an exorcism or deliverance from demons - in Jesus Christ Mighty Name.


    You can support Omega Man Radio and keep it on the air by donating any amount online at omegamanradio.com


    "Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you." LUKE 10:19

  • 03:59

    RULES TO THE GAME: THE ORGANIC ACT OF 1871- YUSEF El

    in Education

    Rules To The Game with your host Yusef EL.


    Tune in every Monday @ 8 AM PST/11 AM PST

  • 00:56

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor  (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • 03:00

    The Road to War and Tuesday Guest Stan Deyo

    in News

    The destabilization of the Middle East is indeed one of the major articles of the agenda of the power elite and is taking place under full throttle today. A potential showdown with Iranian ships on one hand, and backroom dealings on the other are certain to cause confusion to anyone trying to make sense about what's actually taking place. Meanwhile, ISIS now appears to be in full control across Iraq, issuing birth certificates and other government documents to the citizens of the new "Caliphate." All of these geopolitical events appear to be leading us headlong into World War III - a war exactly as written by Master Freemason Albert Pike in 1871.


    Join us as we discuss these issues and welcome our regular Tuesday guest Stan Deyo in hour two.

  • Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Business

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 

  • 01:20

    Voice of Albion - Arnold Spencer Leese 1871 -1956

    in Radio

    Paul Hickman discusses Arnold Spencer Leese (1871 - 1956).


    Leese had orignally been a member of the British Fascists and had been only one of two members to ever hold public office for them (as a Councillor in Stamford).


    In 1927 he moved to London and created the Imperial Fascist League.


    Leese was incarcerated on several oocasions for challenging Jewish Power in England and Freemasons.


    Out of Step - Events in the lives of an Anti-Jewish Camel-Doctor. (1951)

  • 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Finance

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     

  • 01:30

    Black Reconstruction #LaShawnAllenMuhammad 323.927.2913

    in Politics

    Hosted By: LaShawn Allen-Muhammad


    Who were the first Black Elected Officials? During the month of November, as the country gears up to re-elect or vote in the next wave of politicians, Black Reconstruction will revisit the Reconstruction era to pay homage to the Black Men who came before Obama.  During this tumultuous time, Blacks not only established townships, they also positioned themselves to be an integral part of government.   


    At a Glance.. In 1855, Brownhelm Township, founded by Col. Henry Brown,  gained notoriety throughout the U.S, when the township elected an African-American to government office.  The NY Syracuse Daily Journal, May 31, 1855 reported that John Mercer Langston was a fugitive slave who had been elected clerk.  Brownhelm's early residents had long been known for their strong anti-slavery stance; and Col. Henry Brown's home on the Lake Shore was often a final stop on the Underground Railroad, before reaching Canada by boat.    African-American Firsts: Government


    Local elected official: John Mercer Langston, 1855, town clerk of Brownhelm Township, Ohio.


    State elected official: Alexander Lucius Twilight, 1836, the Vermont legislature.


    Governor (appointed): P.B.S. Pinchback served as governor of Louisiana from Dec. 9, 1872-Jan. 13, 1873, during impeachment proceedings against the elected governor.


    U.S. Representative: Joseph Rainey became a Congressman from South Carolina in 1870 and was reelected four more times. 


    U.S. Senator: Hiram Revels became Senator from Mississippi from Feb. 25, 1870, to March 4, 1871, during Reconstruction.  


    There have only been a total of five black senators in U.S. history: the remaining two are Blanche K. Bruce [1875-1881] and Barack Obama 


     


     

Join Host Live Chats

From the BTR Blog