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Meditation in a New York Minute interview with Mark Thornton

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Mark Thornton is the former Chief Operating Officer for a US investment bank. Described as a cross between "Deepak Chopra meets the Sopranos" he has dedicated his life to creating the world's first management consultancy that does one thing: teach Meditation.

At age 26, Mark realized he loved his job, but was dead at his cubicle. Something was missing. He risked approaching his deathbed without having really lived.

Luckily, he met a master who taught him techniques that would reconnect him with his inner resilience, center, poise, insight and inner sense of mastery.

Over the past 25 years, he has learnt wisdom traditions from a number of meditation masters and applied these practices in everyday, real-world, high-pressure business situations.

He has clients from the UK, Australia and Latin America, and has taught meditation to domestic and international organizations and thought leaders including: Harvard Law School, The New York Times, Deloitte Touche, Martha Stewart Omnimedia, Banco Frances, Kripalu, TIAA-CREF, JPMorgan, McKinsey & Co, The United Nations, IBM, IMG, Lazard's and various hedge funds.

He has lectured at the Jacob Javitz Center in New York City and The American Bar Association, been a keynote speaker The Exchange Traded Funds 2nd Global Annual Awards, The Bar Association of Buenos Aries, The University de Saviour in Argentina, Global Capital Acquisition Annual Meeting, as well as a number of key hedge fund industry events.

Mark is also the best-selling author of Meditation in a New York Minute, a book on meditation practices for busy people, and is on the teaching faculty of the Harvard Negotiation Insight Initiative, part of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.

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