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Towards Tesco: Saving the Government 25 Billion Pounds Per Year

  • Broadcast in Business
Jon Hansen

Jon Hansen

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Those of you who have followed me for the past few years will note that I have never been a fan of the overarching, monolithic pursuits of a government looking to "centralize" it procurement function under an enforced compliance model. Especially given the fact that 85% of all such initiatives have and continue to consistently fail. The Veterans Health Administration's Oracle and JD Edwards forays into this realm cost them $650 million US producing nothing more than a congressional hearing. Nor have I felt compelled to rally behind either the Government of Canada's Way Forward initiative or the UK's Gershon Review recommendations. In fact, the only public sector procurement initiative that I have wholeheartedly endorsed (if that is the right word), is the Commonwealth of Virginia's eVA program, which I covered extensively in a series of articles that have frequently appeared in both virtual as well as print publications under the "Yes Virginia There is More to eProcurement Than Software" heading. I even wrote a "Yes Virginia" white paper that has been widely read around the world. So what is it about Colin Cram's paper that would lead to this rare but enthusiastic response. Quite frankly, it is the simplicity of practical observation that can only be achieved through a long and varied career experience that is unencumbered by partisan interests and vendor relationships. In short, while everyone talks about the complexity of the government procurement apparatus, Cram quite unassumingly shows us in everyday terms what actual goes on behind the curtain. Joining me today from the UK to talk about his incredible work over 30 years, and what I consider to be a seminal paper is Colin Cram.

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