Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

"Theology Matters" with The Pellews: Transhumanism with Dr. Fazale Rana

  • Broadcast in Christianity
TRUradio

TRUradio

×  

Follow This Show

If you liked this show, you should follow TRUradio.
h:206845
s:11451615
archived

Join Devin & Melissa Pellew, Co-Chapter Directors of Ratio Christi at Winthrop University, as they discuss topics related to biblical theology, Christian apologetics and worldview issues. For more information on The Pellews' or to support their ministry, please visit https://ratiochristi.org/people/melissa-pellew/.

We are joined by Dr. Fazale Rana of Reasons To Believe to discuss his new book with Ken Samples, Humans 2.0: Scientific, Philosophical and Theological Perspectives on Transhumanism. Formerly a senior scientist in research and development at Procter & Gamble, Fuz graduated with highest honors from West Virginia State College with a BS in chemistry and went on to earn a PhD in chemistry with an emphasis in biochemistry from Ohio University. He pursued postdoctoral studies in the biophysics of cell membranes at the Universities of Virginia and Georgia.

Several articles by Fuz have been published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, such as Biochemistry, Applied Spectroscopy, FEBS Letters, Journal of Microbiological Methods and Journal of Chemical Education, and he has delivered numerous presentations at international scientific meetings. He also holds two patents, authored a chapter on molecular convergence and intelligent design for The Nature of Nature, and co-wrote a chapter on antimicrobial peptides for Biological and Synthetic Membranes. 

Fuz writes and speaks extensively about evidence for creation emerging from biochemistry, genetics, human origins and synthetic biology. As vice president of research and apologetics at Reasons to Believe, he is  dedicated to communicating to skeptics and believers alike the powerful scientific case for God’s existence and the Bible’s reliability. 

 

Comments