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POLITICS WITH JONATHAN CHAIT & STEVE HILTON

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The Halli Casser-Jayne Show

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We return to politics on The Halli Casser-Jayne Show when joining Halli at her table is journalist Jonathan Chait, author of the brand new book AUDACITY HOW BARACK OBAMA DEFIED HIS CRITICS AND CREATED A LEGACY THAT WILL PREVAIL and Steve Hilton, Prime Minister David Cameron's former senior adviser author of MORE HUMAN: DESIGNING A WORLD WHERE PEOPLE COME FIRST.

Jonathan Chait writes about politics and more as a columnist for New York magazine. Previously a senior editor at the New Republic he has also written for the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic. He has been featured throughout the media, including appearances on NPR, MSNBC, Fox News, CNN, HBO, The Colbert Report, Talk of the Nation, C-Span, Hardball, and on talk radio in every major city in America. In his new book AUDACITY, HOW BARACK OBAMA DEFIED HIS CRITICS AND CREATED A LEGACY THAT WILL PREVAIL, Chait makes the argument that most of Obama’s achievements will not only survive a Trump administration, but also the judgment of time, which will proclaim that Obama was among the greatest and most effective presidents in American history.

Steve Hilton has been called many things and one is the Steve Jobs of politics. The T-Shirt clad Hilton is one of UK's most known political figures. As former Prime Minister Cameron's senior adviser, he remade the Tory party into a modern, winning conservative party. Now Hilton has his eyes set on America's political system. In MORE HUMAN: DESIGNING A WORLD WHERE PEOPLE COME FIRST, Hilton posits that government, business, the lives we lead, the food we eat, the way our children are brought up, the way we relate to the natural world around us – it's all become too big and distant and industrialized -- inhuman. 
 

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