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Natalie Talks with clinical psychologist Frank Pasciuti, Ph.D.

  • Broadcast in Self Help
Starz Psychics Network

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Frank Pasciuti, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist and certified hypnotherapist in private practice in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Founder & President of Associated Clinicians of Virginia, which provides psychotherapy and organizational development services to individuals and businesses.

Chairman of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at The Monroe Institute, in Faber, Virginia; and he collaborates on research related to near death experiences (NDEs), psychic phenomena, and the survival of consciousness at the Division of Perceptual Studies (DOPS), a research unit of the department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

  • Author of Chrysalis Crisis, How Life’s Ordeals Can Lead to Personal and Spiritual Transformation. Chrysalis Crisis explains how you can use your life ordeals to bring about personal and spiritual growth. Like the butterfly that struggles to free its wings from the chrysalis cocoon, it can be a struggle to let go of the lingering effects of a crisis.

A quote from Dr. Pascuiti's web site tells you a cause he emphasizes: "We all lose when women are abused, suppressed, and deprived the seats of power."

Women bring a necessary balancing effect to the predominant masculine way we’ve been running our world. That masculine approach has favored the attributes of aggression, competition, and dominance. But these are not always the best ways of addressing critical world concerns.

It’s a little like the saying, if your only tool is a hammer, then every problem looks like a nail. Might and the exertion of physical power aren’t always the right way to “hammer” out problems. They can lead to aggression and war. Competition leaves winners and unhappy losers, and dominance eventually incites rebellion.

Website: frankpasciuti.com

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