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Suicide of a Loved One: A Panel Discussion

  • Broadcast in Self Help
Rise to Shine Radio

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Did a member of your family commit suicide?

If so, was it done in front of you and/or your relatives?

How were you and/or your relatives affected by the suicide of a loved one?

Be here to call in your questions or share your comments. Call  (657) 383-1766.

Note: To protect the identity of our guests, their names and pictures will NOT be used with the exception of Shawna.

The five stages of normal grief that were first proposed by Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross* in her 1969 book On Death and Dying are:

  • denial,  anger,  bargaining,  depression, and  acceptance.

They are a part of the framework that makes up our learning to live with the one we lost.They are tools to help us frame and identify what we may be feeling. But they are not stops on some linear timeline in grief. Not everyone goes through all of them or in a prescribed order. Our hope is that with these stages comes the knowledge of grief ‘s terrain, making us better equipped to cope with life and loss.

At times, people in grief will often report more stages. Just remember your grief is an unique as you are.

* Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross earned a place as the best-loved and most-respected authority on the subjects of death and dying. Through her many books, and her years working with terminally ill children, AIDS patients, and the elderly,Dr. Kubler-Ross brought comfort and understanding to millions coping with their own deaths or the death of a loved one. Her books have been translated into 27 languages. She passed away in 2004 at the age of 78. Before her death, she and David Kessler completed work on their second collaboration, On Grief and Grieving.

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