BlogTalkRadio uses cookies. By using our services, you're agreeing to our Cookies Policy. Got it

Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

How to Use Music for Self-Care with Musiccare Founder Bill Protzman

  • Broadcast in Self Help
A Fine Time for Healing

A Fine Time for Healing

×  

Follow This Show

If you liked this show, you should follow A Fine Time for Healing.
h:177941
s:11595357
archived

There is a special kind of person who seeks the more authentic experience, the genuine moment, the sweet fresh air escape from all the noise –a return to what’s real and what matters most. Often that person feels both called to a purpose and frustrated by the world around them, right on the edge of giving up. That same person may also feel brief flashes of immense power or sustained surges of energy, punctuated by drawn-out periods stalled in the doldrums.This life experience is much more common than most people want to admit,but there’s positive energy available in fear, distress, anger, or sadness,once we start to uncover it.

With access to that energy, could you change things for good? If you were able to leverage your emotions, not just for intelligence, but for fuel, what could you accomplish?

Today's special guest Bill Protzmann is here today to address those fundamental, heart-felt questions; to inspire, delight, and demonstrate the power of music as a tool for self-care.

The mission of the company he founded, Music Care is to remind people of their built-in ability to use emotions for good and offer proven, practical tools for our access to music as a behavioral, emotional, physical, and spiritual self-care modality.

He is a living example of how music can be life-saving and life-affirming. In addition to running a Meetup group for people who, like himself, often think about suicide, he has taught the principles of music asself-care to people ranging from at-risk Veterans to corporate executives, and was recognized for this work in 2014 by the National Council for Behavioral Health with an Award of Excellence, the behavioral health equivalent of winning an Oscar.

 
 

 

Comments