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Black Men Missing: Missing Black Men

  • Broadcast in Visual Arts
Phantom Gallery Chicago Network

Phantom Gallery Chicago Network

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This activation features the B&W images of a family of professional photographers. While they captured the moments of life and events for family, friends and clients this candid shots mark the passages on the other side of the lens documenting the life of family, fatherhood and
the fate of our communities.  The story illustrated through one family emulates the sentiments of us all. The team sought to use the full depth of the gallery space to communicate the passage of time and the inevitable passing of the family patriarch.  The perpetual loss throughout our community.

The theme of Social Justice and the question, where are we now? are answered internally through one family's travails and externally through bold full-color graphic design posters that billboard the exterior boarded windows of the space and illustrate the modern icons of our century.

Who gets to tell the Black American Story? We are the cultural stakeholders of our existence and it is extremely important that we record and tell our very unique stories. It validates and affirms our existence.

Public Engagement facilitated by Larissa Johnson is an interdisciplinary artist, social and cultural curator, arts advocate, youth tutor and mentor, and her greatest accomplishment; mother. She is interested in furthering the access of arts, technology, music and dance to young Black Bodies.  Known as a club kid of the '80s, for over 25 years Larissa Johnson has dedicated her life to the arts; ranging from dance, visual arts, fashion, music, and cultural preservation. In 2003, she founded  Rhythm’s  Production, a consulting, social marketing and arts advocacy firm that serves as a resource for Chicago DJs and artists and The Social Move in 2011.   

 

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