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Deepertruth: Eucharistic Miracle of Fiecht, Austria 1310

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The little village of St. Georgenberg-Fiecht in the Inn Valley is very well known - especially because of a Eucharistic miracle that took place there in 1310. During the Mass, the priest was seized with temptations regarding the Real Presence of Jesus in the consecrated Elements.

Right after the consecration, the wine changed into Blood and began to boil and overflow the chalice. In 1480, after 170 years, the Sacred Blood was "still fresh as though coming out of a wound," wrote the chronicler of those days. The Precious Blood is preserved intact to this day and is contained in the reliquary in the Monastery of St. Georgenberg.

Near the side altar of the monastery church there is a documentary tablet that says: “In the year of grace 1310, under Abbot Rupert, a priest was celebrating Holy Mass in this church dedicated to the holy martyr George and the holy apostle, James. After consecrating the wine, he was seized with a doubt as to whether the Blood of Christ was really present under the species of wine. Suddenly the wine changed into red blood that began to boil in the chalice and overflow it. The abbot and his monks, who happened to be in the choir, and the numerous pilgrims who were present at the celebration, approached the altar and realized what had happened.

 

The priest, terrified, was unable to drink all the Holy Blood, and so the abbot placed the remainder in a vessel in the tabernacle of the main altar near the cloth with which the chalice was wiped.

. So great was the number of the devotees of the Holy Blood that in 1472 Bishop Georg von Brixen sent the abbot of Wilten, Joahannes Lösch, and the pastors, Sigmund Thaur and Kaspar of Absam, to better study the phenomenon.

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