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Care Break: If There's So Many of Us, Why Is Caregiving So Lonely?

  • Broadcast in Caregiving
Denise Brown

Denise Brown

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Pew Research Center released a study in 2013 that says about 39% of U. S. adults–up from 30% in 2010–care for an adult or child with significant health issues.

In other words, two in every five individuals are family caregivers.

I’ve been thinking about this number because I can’t quite get it to add up.

Here’s why. If 39% of U.S. adults are family caregivers, why is caregiving still such a lonely and isolating experience? Why, every year in our annual family caregiver survey, do you talk about the loneliness of the experience? Why haven’t more programs and services been added in your community to help you? Why do you still worry about telling your boss about your caregiving responsibilities? Why doesn’t the doctor’s office share a list of caregiving resources to help you? Why doesn’t a home health agency refer you to a website, like ours, so you can connect with others in a similar situation? Why can’t you find a family restroom to assist your caree?

Why is caregiving still an experience that feels like it’s just you rather than one that feels like it’s you plus (and within) a community that supports?

Bruce and I will share our thoughts about why we think caregiving is still such a lonely experience.

About Bruce, our show's co-host:
Bruce lives to encourage and inspire as many people as possible, especially caregivers and those living with a chronic condition. He is the author of Resilient Life and Graceful Transitions. He has served as a non-profit, church, and business leader. You can purchase Graceful Transitions at caregiving.com and read more from Bruce at brucemcintyre.com.

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