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Indo-European Pope Started Church With The Inquisition And Crusader Killers.

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Cosmic Philosopher

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DID KING DAVID LAW OF PALESTINE  AUTHORIZED THE FOLLOWING  ACTIONS  FOR THE SODOMITE POPE AND WHICH KING'S LAW AUTHORIZED THE TERRORIST INQUISITION AND THE CRUSADERS?

There is a book titled NEW ENGLAND FRONTIER: Puritans and Indians 1620-1675 by Alden T. Vaughan. It was originally published in 1965 (Little Brown & Company, Boston/Toronto), and revised as recently as 1995. Vaughan, an admitted friend of the Puritan colony, makes a well documented case for the efforts of the Pilgrims (Separatists) and early Puritans to win the Indians to Christ. The book contains three chapters detailing the Puritans successful missionary endeavors during those early years. For example, the first Bible printed in the Western world was the Indian Algonquin Scripture. Harvard University (1636) was founded not only to train whites to become ministers of the Gospel, but there was also for a time a training program for young Indian men to minister to their people. At least six Boston area communities, thriving today, were started by Christian Indians. The famous island, Martha’s Vineyard, once was the site of Indian Christian congregations through the missionary endeavors of the Mayhew family. Dartmouth University had its beginning through the efforts of a Connecticut Puritan to train Indian young men to preach the Gospel.

But Vaughan’s book also reveals just how brutal the Puritans were in their dealings with the Indians — specifically, Chapter V, “The Pequot War, 1637.” What is amazing about the account in this chapter is the frankness with which the author recounts the events and the Puritans part in them. The carnage and the Puritan justification for participation therein is quite revealing — self-defense is one thing, but outright purposeful slaughter is, to say the least, questionable Christian behavior (from 1965 edition)

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