What is human papillomavirus's (HPV) role in cancer? with Dr.CHRIS FISHER

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fisherDr.CHRIS FISHER Co-founder and Director of Biology of NanoVir, LLC in Kalamazoo. Fisher is a cell and developmental biologist with extensive drug discovery experience. NanoVir’s research is focused on antiviral drug treatments for high-risk human papillomavirus, or HPV, a primary cause of cervical cancer. Recently, the company received a $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to fund research into new drug candidates to fight the viruses that cause cervical cancer. The three-year grant complements a $1.8 million, five-year research grant the NIH awarded to NanoVir in May and brings total grant funding for NanoVir to more than $9.5 million since the company was started in 2004. The company also has received funding from Western Michigan University’s (WMU) Biosciences Research and Commercialization Center and the Michigan Economic Development Corp. In 2006 the Small Business Association recognized NanoVir with the Tibbett’s Award for technological innovation. Prior to cofounding NanoVir with James Bashkin, Fisher was a research adviser and senior scientist for Pharmacia Corp. (formerly Upjohn) where he played a leading role in key drug discovery projects investigating the molecular machinery regulating cell division. He also served on the faculty of the University of Washington School of Medicine where he was funded by the NIH to research embryonic development and cell biology. Among other works, Fisher is recognized as co-author of the “Hen’s tooth” paper, a classic work in evolutionary biology. He also serves as an adjunct professor in biological sciences at WMU. He received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biology from the University of South Carolina and his Ph.D. in biomedical science from the University of Connecticut.

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