Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

Curtis Harwell and Kelli Richardson Discuss Nutritional Timing and When to Eat

  • Broadcast in Fitness
  • 0 comments
Curtis Harwell Fitness Radio

Curtis Harwell Fitness Radio

×  

Follow This Show

If you liked this show, you should follow Curtis Harwell Fitness Radio.
h:551845
s:6653529
archived

What is nutrient timing?

Nutrient timing is a planned alteration of macronutrient intake in order to promote health, workout performance, and get/stay lean.

Nutrient timing strategies are based on how the body handles different types of food at different times. One of the most important nutrient timing principles is that it’s best to eat most non-fruit and veggie carbohydrates during and after exercise.

Many factors influence energy balance, with the laws of thermodynamics being the most important determinants of weight gain and weight loss. Yes, this means how much we eat is priority #1 when changing body composition.

But the key here is “body composition.” If we’re losing equal amounts of fat and muscle when losing weight or gaining equal amounts of fat and muscle when gaining weight, we’re not taking advantage of nutrient timing.

Nutrient timing has several important goals:

  • Nutrient partitioning (where the nutrients go when you ingest them)
  • Improved health
  • Improved body composition
  • Improved athletic performance
  • Enhanced workout recovery

Why is nutrient timing so important?

When you exercise regularly, the body is primed for fat gain or fat loss just as it’s primed for muscle gain or muscle loss during specific times of the day.  The wrong foods at the wrong times sabotage your efforts in the gym. The right foods at the right times enhance those efforts.

Once we account for energy balance, timing nutrient intake can up-regulate metabolism, shift hormonal profile, and alter body composition.

Manipulating nutrient intake can also help someone take advantage of certain anabolic hormones, namely insulin.

Comments

 comments