Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

COLOR OF LAW

  • Broadcast in News
  • 0 comments
Mayor Carmen Sabatino

Mayor Carmen Sabatino

×  

Follow This Show

If you liked this show, you should follow Mayor Carmen Sabatino.
h:42586
s:7786871
archived

COLOR OF LAW

U.S. law enforcement officers and other officials like judges, prosecutors, and security guards have been given tremendous power by local, state, and federal government agencies—authority they must have to enforce the law and ensure justice in our country. These powers include the authority to detain and arrest suspects, to search and seize property, to bring criminal charges, to make rulings in court, and to use deadly force in certain situations.

Preventing abuse of this authority, however, is equally necessary to the health of our nation’s democracy. That’s why it’s a federal crime for anyone acting under “color of law” willfully to deprive or conspire to deprive a person of a right protected by the Constitution or U.S. law. “Color of law” simply means that the person is using authority given to him or her by a local, state, or federal government agency.

The FBI is the lead federal agency for investigating color of law abuses, which include acts carried out by government officials operating both within and beyond the limits of their lawful authority. Off-duty conduct may be covered if the perpetrator asserted his or her official status in some way.

During 2012, 42 percent of the FBI’s total civil rights caseload involved color of law issues—there were 380 color of law cases opened during the year. Most of the cases involved crimes that fell into into five broad areas:

  • Excessive force;
  • Sexual assaults;
  • False arrest and fabrication of evidence;
  • Deprivation of property; and
  • Failure to keep from harm.

Comments

 comments