Our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy have changed. We think you'll like them better this way.

THE PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECT ON TEENS AND CHILDREN WHO PARENTS ARE INCARCERATED

  • Broadcast in Social Networking
  • 0 comments
TEENS SPEAKING OUT

TEENS SPEAKING OUT

×  

Follow This Show

If you liked this show, you should follow TEENS SPEAKING OUT.
h:111323
s:7403203
archived

On any given day in America, it is estimated that more than 1.5 million children have a parent incarcerated in a state or federal prison. And more than 10 million children are living with a parent who has come under some form of criminal justice supervision at some point in the child’s life.

The Annie E. Casey foundation discovered the compelling needs and circumstances of children with incarcerated parents, such as:

  • Since 1990, the number of female prisoners had grown by nearly 50 percent; three-quarters of incarcerated women are mothers, and two thirds have children under age 18.
  • Most law enforcement agencies lack training and protocols on where to place children when a parent is arrested and, often, ultimately incarcerated.
  • Approximately 10 percent of children with incarcerated mothers and 2 percent of children with incarcerated fathers are in foster care.
  • There are a disparate impact on minorities, with African-American children nine times more likely and Hispanic children three times more likely than white children to have a parent in prison.
  • Despite widespread statements that children with incarcerated parents are many times more likely than other children to be incarcerated as adults.
  • Risk factors such as parental mental illness, parental substance abuse, family violence and poverty were present in many children’s homes and lives prior to their parents’ incarceration. 

Comments

 comments