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Billy Turner Talks About "A Murder in Our Midst"

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Tense race relations, a clash of classes, and international intrigue collide in this taut mystery, which will keep readers guessing.

“My background in government and my experience as an African-American raised during this turbulent time give me unique insight into this subject.  I’ve always had a passion for mysteries and now that I’ve retired from my position as a supervisor for the State of California, I’ve devoted myself to writing,” says, author, Billy Turner.

“A Murder in Our Midst” is the first in a proposed series following Sir Robert Winchell and the cases that will challenge his intellect along with his nerve.  Turner is currently at work on his first novel’s sequel:  Death Comes for the President.

 

William Turner bio:

 

William Turner spent his formative years in New England. He was educated in the private, parochial school system, and is presently retired from State service (State of California), as a supervisor. He has one son (Ontonio), and three grandchildren. His grandson is serving in the United States Air Force. His daughter-in-law, Bridgette, is a practicing pediatrician. William had aspired--so long ago--to be a priest, but felt at the time he had not been exposed enough to life to walk away and close the monastery door. His subsequent exposure to life sullied him beyond any aspiration to the priesthood. William now lives in Lancaster, California, spending much of his time doing penance, reflecting on his countless errors in judgment. William's penchant for writing mysteries stems from his exposure to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's stories and those of Agatha Christie. His mentor was Sister Agnes Bernard--his high school English teacher.

 

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