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The Legal and Moral Implications of Workplace Bullying

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The TalentCulture #TChat Show is back live on Wednesday, July 30, 2014, from 7-8 pm ET (4-5 pm PT). The #TChat radio portion runs the first 30 minutes from 7-7:30 pm ET, followed by the #TChat Twitter chat from 7:30-8 pm ET.

Last week we talked about the state of HR Technology, and this week we’re talking about workplace bullying and the legal and moral implications.

Wow. According to one recent study, 96% of American employees experience bullying in the workplace, and the nature of that bullying is changing thanks to social media and online interactions.

Even though the employment world is already heavily regulated, one major gap remains: workplace bullying. No state prohibits bullying, unless it relates to a protected group (such as race, sex or disability).

But workplace bullying has harmful, reverberating effects, not only on the victims, but also on the witnesses. The good news is that we don’t need to wait for a law to be enacted to prevent and respond to bullying.

Progressive employers who want to be successful ensure their cultures are bully-free. This week’s guest will talk about how.   

Join #TChat co-creators and hosts Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman as we learn more about workplace bullying with this week’s guest: Jonathan Segal, an employment lawyer and partner with the international law firm Duane Morris LLP, as well as an active TalentCulture #TChat community member.

Thank you to our sponsors and partners: RIVS, GreatRated of Great Place to Work, TalentWise, Globoforce, SAP/SuccessFactors, PeopleFluent, Red Branch Media and HRmarketer Insight.

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