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  • 02:49
  • 00:30

    The Corporal Works of Mercy - To Give Drink to the Thirsty

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org

    The Catholic Church teaches in our Catechism that “the works of mercy are charitable actions by which we come to the aid of our neighbor in his spiritual and bodily necessities.”

    Suffering caused by deprivation of material well-being, oppression, illness, and death are all signs of our frailty as humans.  Our Catechism also teaches us that our need for salvation is a result of our original sin.  All the members of Christ’s Church are required to work on behalf of those who suffer. The Corporal Works of Mercy are the seven practices of charity, based on Christ’s prediction of the Last judgment that we find in the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 25:41).   We are reminded that in doing these things, we are serving Christ Himself.

  • 02:00


    in Blogs


  • 00:28

    St. Vincent de Paul

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org

    St. Vincent was born of poor parents in the village of Pouy in Gascony, France, about 1580. He enjoyed his first schooling under the Franciscan Fathers at Acqs. Such had been his progress in four years that a gentleman chose him as subpreceptor to his children, and he was thus enabled to continue his studies without being a burden to his parents. In 1596, he went to the University of Toulouse for theological studies, and there he was ordained priest in 1600.

    In 1605, on a voyage by sea from Marseilles to Narbonne, he fell into the hands of African pirates and was carried as a slave to Tunis. His captivity lasted about two years, until Divine Providence enabled him to effect his escape. After a brief visit to Rome he returned to France, where he became preceptor in the family of Emmanuel de Gondy, Count of Goigny, and General of the galleys of France. In 1617, he began to preach missions, and in 1625, he lay the foundations of a congregation which afterward became the Congregation of the Mission or Lazarists, so named on account of the Prioryof St. Lazarus, which the Fathers began to occupy in 1633.

    It would be impossible to enumerate all the works of this servant of God. Charity was his predominant virtue. It extended to all classes of persons, from forsaken childhood to old age. The Sisters of Charity also owe the foundation of their congregation to St. Vincent. In the midst of the most distracting occupations his soul was always intimately united with God. Though honored by the great ones of the world, he remained deeply rooted in humility. The Apostle of Charity, the immortal Vincent de Paul, breathed his last in Paris at the age of eighty. His feast day is September 27th.

  • 00:28

    St. Benedict The Moor

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org

    Benedict the Moor was born a slave near Messina, Italy. He was freed by his master, became a solitary, eventually settling with other hermits at Montepellegrino. He was made superior of the community, but when he was about thirty-eight, Pope Pius IV disbanded communities of solitaries and he became a Franciscan lay brother. He cooked at St. Mary's convent near Palermo. He was appointed against his will, superior of the convent when it opted for the reform, though he could neither read nor write. After serving as superior, he became a novice master but asked to be relieved of his post and returned to his former position as cook. His holiness, reputation for miracles, and his fame as a confessor brought hordes of visitors to see the obscure and humble cook. He died at the convent, was canonized in 1807, and is the patron saint of blacks in the United States. The surname "the Moor" is a misnomer originating from the Italian IL MORO (the black.) His feast day is April 4th.

  • 00:28

    St. Gerard Majella

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org

    St. Gerard Majella is the patron of expectant mothers. He was born in 1726 in Muro, Italy to a family of seven. Majella grew up in a poverty with a great respect for the poor. Shortly after his father's death, his mother sent him away to live with his uncle and learn to become a tailor, like his father. 

    Majella began earning money as a journeyman at the age of 21, splitting his earnings with his mother, and the poor of Muro. In 1749, at the age of 23, he joined the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer and just three years later became a professed lay brother.

    Majella lived with the three vows of Poverty, Chasity and Obedience. He stayed close with the poor and worked very many different jobs. He served as sacristan, gardener, porter, infirmarian, and tailor. However, because of his great piety, extraordinary wisdom, and his gift of reading consciences, he was permitted to counsel communities of religious women. 

    Throughout his years of life, several reported miracles are tied to Majella. including, restoring a boy's life after he fell from a high cliff; blessing a poor farmer's crops, ridding it of mice; blessing a poor family's supply of wheat, causing it to last until the next harvest; and he multiplied bread for the poor on several occasions.

    Along with his miracles effected through prayers for woman in labor, Majella's last recorded miracle is one that many credit toward his becoming the patron of expectant mothers. 

    Due to the numerous miracles performed through Majella's prayers, proceedings for his canonization began shortly after his death. In 1893, Majella was beatified by Pope Leo XIII and on December 11, 1904, Pope Pius X canonized the man of God.

  • 00:21

    Suns Talk Radio- 2 Weeks Down...

    in Sports

    Already a few weeks into the season, the Suns strong 6-4 start continues. With big time victories over the Los Angeles Clippers and the Denver Nuggets, Phoenix has been on a roll looking for their 4th straight win this week. Host Zach Parnees will be breaking down the good and the bad, while also taking a glance a the week ahead. Call into the show and throw out your questions to us! 323-870-4073. Also feel free to follow us on Twitter @SunsTalkRadio. 

  • 00:04

    Why The Next Few Weeks Are Important To CEOs And Business Owners

    in Business

    Listen to today's Talk Business With Howard 5 minute podcast with business expert - strategist - and advisor to CEOs, presidents and business owners, Howard Lewinter: Why The Next Few Weeks Are Important To CEOs And Business Owners.

  • 00:28

    Warriors undefeated two weeks in - 11/13/15

    in Basketball

    Nate Parham, Bram Kincheloe, and Ivan Bettger discuss the Warriors' rampage through the first couple weeks of the season. Finishing off the Minnesota Timberwolves on the road, the Warriors stand at 10-0, and the crew wonders whether they'll ever lose again. 

  • 00:29

    St. Teresa of Ávila

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org

    Teresa of Ávila was born Teresa Ali Fatim Corella Sanchez de Capeda y Ahumada in Ávila, Spain. Less than twenty years before Teresa was born in 1515, Columbus opened up the Western Hemisphere to European colonization. Two years after she was born, Luther started the Protestant Reformation. 

    When she finally chose religious life, she did so because she though that it was the only safe place for someone as prone to sin as she was. Once installed at the Carmelite convent permanently, she started to learn and practice mental prayer, in which she "tried as hard as I could to keep Jesus Christ present within me..."  

    For years she hardly prayed at all "under the guise of humility." She thought as a wicked sinner she didn't deserve to get favors from God. 

    When she was 41, a priest convinced her to go back to her prayer. As she started to pray again, God gave her spiritual delights. 

    At the age of 43, she became determined to found a new convent that went back to the basics of a contemplative order: a simple life of poverty devoted to prayer. At 51, she felt it was time to spread her reform movement. She braved burning sun, ice and snow, thieves, and rat-infested inns to found more convents. But those obstacles were easy compared to what she face from her brothers and sisters in religious life.

    She is the founder of the Discalced Carmelites. In 1970 she was declared a Doctor of the Church for her writing and teaching on prayer, one of two women to be honored in this way.

    St. Teresa is the patron saint of Headache sufferers. Her symbol is a heart, an arrow, and a book. She was canonized in 1622. Her Feast Day is October 15.

  • 00:28

    St. Dominic Savio - the teenage Saint

    in Religion

    Rebroadcast of the long running radio program, "The Ave Maria Hour", a presentation of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement. www.AtonementFriars.org

    Born into a peasant family at Riva, Italy, young Dominic joined St. John Bosco as a student at the Oratory in Turin at the age of 12. He impressed John with his desire to be a priest and to help him in his work with neglected boys. A peacemaker and an organizer, young Dominic founded a group he called the Company of the Immaculate Conception which, besides being devotional, aided John Bosco with the boys and with manual work. All the members save one, Dominic, would in 1859 join John in the beginnings of his Salesian congregation. By that time, Dominic had been called home to heaven.

    As a youth, Dominic spent hours rapt in prayer. His raptures he called "my distractions." Even in play, he said that at times "It seems heaven is opening just above me. I am afraid I may say or do something that will make the other boys laugh." Dominic would say, "I can't do big things. But I want all I do, even the smallest thing, to be for the greater glory of God."

    Dominic's health, always frail, led to lung problems and he was sent home to recuperate. As was the custom of the day, he was bled in the thought that this would help, but it only worsened his condition. He died on March 9, 1857, after receiving the Last Sacraments. St. John Bosco himself wrote the account of his life.

    Some thought that Dominic was too young to be considered a saint. St. Pius X declared that just the opposite was true, and went ahead with his cause. Dominic was canonized in 1954.

    His feast day is March 9th.