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  • 03:03

    Selma 50 Years Later

    in Entertainment

    The march in Selma was a historic event for our community. Many brothers and sisters suffered at the hands of the police on bloody sunday. The recent movie Selma shared with us a piece of history that isn't taught in American schools. A few things have changed for our community since that great march. We have the first African American president and have made great advances in our community. Sadly some of the same issues from 50 years ago we still deal with today. How can we improve and make progress? Why are racist still and forever obsessed with us as black people?

  • 00:29

    50 Years Later-Selma

    in Self Help

    The march on Selma was celebrated yesterday. I viewed the march as a courageous act by Black people. But, at what cost? 50 years later and we are still not where we need to be economically. My mother in-law asked me was I watching it. This is what you read about, she stated. I told her no. I think it is commendable that they would put their lives on the line. But, while we were getting our heads bashed in to sit at a white man's lunch counter. We were signing our own death certificate economically.

  • 01:01

    Selma: 50 Years Later, We Reflect

    in Education

    Join NCEBCTalkRadio show hosts, Dr. Eric Cooper and Dr. Nicole McZeal Walters for a history-making moment with NCEBC Queen Mother and renowned Education Activist, Dr. Adealide Sanford for a relfection on the recent 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday.


    Dr. Sanford participated in the Jubliee Celebration in Selma, AL in the company of many civil rights activists - names known and unknown. Among them were Ms. Jan McCray, _____________________.


    Join us as we welcome them to the show to discuss their thoughts, feelings, and impressions of the event.  Share yours at 714-242-5228.

  • 01:00

    Navigating Fitness After 50: With - Debra Atkinson Thurs. March 19 - 12 noon PT

    in Women

    Join us as Debra shares her knowledge and expertise on fitness and as a personal trainer. An author, healthy lifestyle expert for 30 years, Debra Atkinson instantly connects with people to give them the tools they need to live, work and play with more energy and fun.


    Debra has been speaking on fitness and life-enhancing topics for more than 25 years. She’s a member of the National Speakers Association and has spoken to hundreds of audiences of all types and sizes including church groups, women’s groups, bankers, professional fitness associations, sheriffs associations (hold the fire!), insurance groups, Health Care Associations and Golf Pros. Personal responsibility for physical activity and nutrition is the common theme in her message, whether that message is for greater productivity at work, decreasing stress levels or improving life satisfaction. She calls herself a Barely Boomer and speaks frequently on Active Aging.


    You can find her at: The Voice for Fitness.

     

  • 01:00

    Leaving Cuba 50 years ago with Orestes Matacena

    in Politics

    Guest:  Orestes Matacena, actor & movie director, remembers coming to the US 50 years ago.


    Check out our new sponsor:   AUDIBLE.COM  (www.audibletrial.com/cantotalk.)


    Looking for a good book?  Check out my book: 


    CUBANOS IN WISCONSIN BY SILVIO CANTO JR

  • 02:00

    Heroes of Katrina: 10 Years After - Firefighter Jim Prince, There and Back...

    in Books

    Jim Prince, a native of Central Michigan with over 20 years of fire and rescue service experience spent about 6 months in New Orleans first as a Volunteer Firefighter then as a Logistics Generalist for FEMA.


    Jim will recount his experiences in the shattered region and provide fascinating insight into events and occurrences.


    Jim had some amazing experiences with FEMA in various ways which he will share.  On this show we will focus on aspects of the infrastructure, how the federal/state/local resources may have been better deployed…and provide significant insight into the balance of the three key governmental entities.


    Cary and Gretchen will be hosting…we encourage folks to call in and share their feelings…See ya there!


    If you don’t like FEMA…call in…ask some questions or share your anger…Call in and lets crawl into the controversy…necessary or not…open discussion is a catharsis…let’s get ‘er done!


    Author Cary Black wrote an epoch novel of American heroism called Katrina: A Freight Train Screamin’.  The book tells the real story of the worst natural disaster to hit the United States.  It chronicles the stories of the people who were on the ground savings lives, the people who were reaching out to rescue the millions of abandoned animals, and the people who survived and heroically came back, dug in, and rebuilt their lives from the chaos.  The stories reflect the thoughts of regular folks having to fight for their lives and finding heroism in their souls as they struggled to deal with the enormity of the storm.


    The book tells these peoples stories in a way that makes the reader realize how far reaching the depth of this tragedy was...Never to be forgotten

  • 00:33

    ScreenPicks Movie Reviews: 50 Shades of Grey, Kingsman, The Last Five Years

    in Movies

    On this week's ScreenPicks Movie Show, we review three new films. First we look at the new Valentine's Day film that has the nation buzzing - Fifty Shades of Grey. Then we'll review the new action film Kingsman: The Secret Service, starring Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson, and Taron Egerton. Finally, we look at The Last Five Years, a new musical with Anna Kendrick. 

  • 01:58

    This Week's Guest is Learning Disabilities Advocate Jason Oliver

    in Health

    Learning Disabilities Advocate Jason Oliver joins us this week on The Best Years in Life Radio.  Coming from a learning disabilities background, himself, Jason overcame insurmountable challenges and now he is an advocate helping children and adults alike, giving them the hope that they, too, can make a difference.  Tune in for this special and important interview.


    During the first half hour, Tony will go over additions to our website and his topic will be:  Giving nature the time it needs to heal.


    During the second half hour, Luella will conclude her series on the importance of an empath learning to manage emotions received from other people.

  • 00:31
  • 02:34

    50 Shades of Gray - Racism in America

    in Culture

    Years after slavery and segregation has ended racism still thrives in America, but why?  Tonight we address that question and more. Join in on the conversation


     

  • 02:03

    O YE DRYBONES : Black Like Me, 50 Years Later UNCUT

    in Current Events

    John Howard Griffin had embarked on a journey unlike any other. Many black authors had written about the hardship of living in the Jim Crow South. A few white writers had argued for integration. But Griffin, a novelist of extraordinary empathy rooted in his Catholic faith, had devised a daring experiment. To comprehend the lives of black people, he had darkened his skin to become black. As the civil rights movement tested various forms of civil disobedience, Griffin began a human odyssey through the South, from New Orleans to Atlanta.

    John Howard Griffin and the Story of Black Like Me. “It’s a useful historical document about the segregated era, which is still shocking to younger readers. It’s also a truthful journal in which Griffin admits to his own racism, with which white readers can identify and perhaps begin to face their own denial of prejudice
    Most Americans saw civil rights as a “Southern problem,” but Griffin’s theological studies had convinced him that racism was a human problem. “If a white man became a Negro in the Deep South,” he wrote on the first page of Black Like Me, “what adjustments would he have to make?” Haunted by the idea, Griffin decided to cross the divide. “The only way I could see to bridge the gap between us,” he would write, “was to become a Negro
    As the civil rights movement accelerated, Griffin gave more than a thousand lectures and befriended black spokesmen ranging from Dick Gregory to Martin Luther King Jr. Notorious throughout the South, he was trailed by cops and targeted by Ku Klux Klansmen, 
    leaving him for dead. By the late 1960s, however, the civil rights movement and rioting in Northern cities highlighted the national scale of racial injustice .








     

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